William Holden

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William Holden

Holden in a publicity photo, 1954
Born William Franklin Beedle, Jr.
April 17, 1918(1918-04-17)
O'Fallon, Illinois, U.S.
Died November 12, 1981(1981-11-12) (aged 63)
Santa Monica, California, U.S.
Cause of death bleeding following a fall
Occupation Actor, wildlife conservationist
Years active 1938–81
Political party Republican[1]
Spouse Brenda Marshall (m. 1941–1971) «start: (1941)–end+1: (1972)»"Marriage: Brenda Marshall to William Holden" Location: (linkback://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Holden) (divorced)

William Holden (April 17, 1918 - November 12, 1981) was an American actor.

Holden was born in O'Fallon, Illinois and moved to South Pasadena, California when he was three. He was a star during the golden age of Hollywood. He began his career western movies including Arizona (1940), Texas (1941). In 1948 he starred with Glenn Ford, the Columbia Pictures western, The Man from Colorado, directed by Henry Levin. Then another western, Rachel and the Stranger (1948), with Loretta Young and Robert Mitchum.

He won an Academy Award for Stalag 17 (1953), where he played a prisoner in a German Nazi camp during World War II. He was also nominated twice more for Sunset Boulevard (1951) and Network (1977).

Among his best works in film highlights Submarine Command (1951), Sabrina (1954), The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957).

He starred with John Wayne in The Horse Soldiers (1957), and with Richard Widmark in Alvarez Kelly (1966).

In 1969, he played an outlaw leader, in the Sam Peckinpah film, The Wild Bunch.

In the 1970s, Holden worked in The Towering Inferno (1974), and When Time Ran Out (1980).

He played the role of Richard Thorn, the adoptive father of a child possessed by the devil, in the second film of The Omen, Damien: Omen II (1978).

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