112 (emergency telephone number)

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1-1-2
Centrum Powiadamiania Ratunkowego w Krakowie 4.JPG

The telephone number 1-1-2 (or 112) is the standard European Union (EU) emergency telephone number, it works in every country of the EU, for land lines and mobile phones. It is also used in some other countries as an emergency telephone number for both mobile and fixed-line telephones.

112 is also the international emergency telephone number for all GSM mobile phone networks. It does not necessarily work on other mobile phone technologies outside the EU.

Countries that use 112[change | change source]

Countries which use the 112 number for emergencies include:

Africa[change | change source]

  •  Egypt (alongside 122 for Police, 123 for Ambulance and 180 for Fire)
  •  Ghana[1]
  •  Mauritius (Police only; alongside 114 for Ambulance and 115 for Fire)
  •  Nigeria
  •  Rwanda (Police and fire brigade; 912 for Ambulance)
  •  Senegal (alongside 17 for Police, 18 for Fire, and 15 for Ambulance)
  •  South Africa (alongside 10111 for Police)

Asia[change | change source]

  •  Armenia (fire dep. 101, police dep. 102, ambulance 103)
  •  Azerbaijan (alongside 102 for Police, 103 for Ambulance , alongside 112 , 911 forwards to 112 on GSM carriers only)
  •  China (A recorded guidance about the correct SOS numbers in China: Police 110, Ambulance 120, Fire 119. NO SERVICE will be redirected.)[2]
  •  East Timor
  •  Hong Kong (Automatically connects to the 999 emergency call centre from any local mobile phone network that has coverage in the location)
  •  India (alongside 100 for Police, 101 for Fire, 108 for Ambulance and 102 for Emergency Disaster Management Now in India 112 is emergency for all including for Ambulance and Fire )
  •  Indonesia (alongside 110 for Police, 118 for Ambulance and 113 for Fire)[3]
  •  Iran (alongside 110 for Police, 115 for Ambulance, 112 for Hilal Ahmar Ambulance and 125 for Fire; 911 is redirected to 112 on mobile phones)
  •  Israel (Redirects to 100 – Police – and will serve the planned unified center. alongside 100 for Police, 101 for Ambulance and 102 for Fire).
  •  Jordan (alongside 911)
  •  Kazakhstan (alongside 101 for Fire, 102 for Police and 103 for Ambulance)
  •  Kuwait (alongside 112)
  •  Kyrgyzstan (alongside 101 for Fire, 102 for Police and 103 for Ambulance)
  •  Lebanon (Police only; alongside 160 for Police, 140 for Ambulance and 125 for Fire)
  •  Macau (alongside 999)
  •  Malaysia (Redirects to 999 on mobile phones)
  •  Mongolia (alongside 102 for Police, 103 for Ambulance and 105 for Fire)
  •    Nepal (Police only; alongside 100 for Police, 101 for Fire and 102 for Ambulance)
  •  Palestine (fire dep. 102, police dep. 100, ambulance 101)
  •  Saudi Arabia (alongside 911)
  •  South Korea (Police only; alongside 119 for Ambulance and Fire)
  •  Sri Lanka (Police only; alongside 119 for Police and 110 for Ambulance and Fire)
  •  Syria (Police only; alongside 110 for Ambulance and 113 for Fire)
  • Template:TWN-ROC (After call is connected, press 0 redirects 110 (police), press 9 redirects 119 (fire/rescue/ambulance) )
  •  United Arab Emirates (alongside 999 for Police, 998 for Ambulance and 997 for Fire)
  •  Uzbekistan
  •  Oman (alongside 9999 for Royal Police (All emergencies))

Europe[change | change source]

  •  Albania (alongside 129 and 126 for Police, 127 for Ambulance, 128 for Fire and 125 for Maritime Rescue)
  •  Andorra (Ambulance and Fire, alongside 118 for same services and 110 for Police)
  •  Austria (Police only; alongside 122 for Fire, 133 for Police,144 for Rescue/Ambulance, 140 for Mountain Resuce and 141 - Doctors; 059 133 is the non-emergency number for any local police department)
  •  Belarus (Fire only; alongside 101 for Fire, 102 for Police, and 103 for Ambulance)
  •  Belgium (only in French, Dutch and English (in some cases in German)[4] ) (Ambulance and Fire; alongside 100 for same services and 101 for Police)
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina (alongside 122 for Police, 123 for Fire and 124 for Ambulance)
  •  Bulgaria (only in Bulgarian, English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Romanian, Turkish, or Russian[5])(alongside 150 for Ambulance, 160 for Fire and 166 for Police automatically redirected to 112)
  •  Croatia (alongside 192 for Police, 193 for Fire, 194 for Ambulance and 195 for Maritime search and rescue)
  •  Cyprus (alongside 199)
  •  Czech Republic (only in Czech, English, German, Polish, Russian and French(not by themselves, but by aid of translation software)[6]) (alongside 155 for Ambulance, 158 for Police and 150 for Fire)
  •  Denmark (in Danish, English, Swedish and Norwegian (in some cases in German)[7]) (including  Greenland in Kalaallisut/Greenlandic, Danish and English,  Faroe Islands in Faroese, Danish and English). Alongside 114 for non-emergency police.
  •  Estonia
  •  Finland (including  Åland)
  •  France (alongside 15 for Ambulance, 17 for Police and 18 for Fire)
  •  Germany (alongside 110 for Police)
  •  Gibraltar (alongside 190 for Fire and Ambulance and 199 for Police)
  •  Georgia
  •  Greece (alongside 100 for the police, 108 for port police, 166 for Ambulance and 199 for the fire service)
  •  Hungary (alongside 104 for Ambulance, 105 for Fire and 107 for Police is redirected to 112 on mobile phones)
  •  Iceland
  •  Ireland (alongside 999)
  •  Italy (most of Italy has 112 for Carabinieri, 113 for National Police, 115 for Fire, 118 for Ambulance, 1530 coast guard, 1515 State Forestry Corps, 117 Finance Guard and 1544 penitentiary police; a few provinces use 112 for all emergencies[8])
  •  Kosovo (alongside 192 for Police, 193 for Fire and 194 for Ambulance)
  •  Latvia (alongside 110 for Police, 113 for Ambulance and 114 for Emergency gas service)
  •  Liechtenstein (Police only; alongside 117 for Police, 144 for Ambulance and 118 for Fire)
  •  Lithuania (alongside 011 for Fire, 022 for Police and 033 for Ambulance)
  •  Luxembourg (alongside 113 for Police)
  •  Malta
  •  Moldova (sole emergency number since 1 July 2018,[9] replacing 901 for Fire, 902 for Police and 903 for Ambulance)
  •  Monaco (alongside 15 for Ambulance, 17 for Police and 18 for Fire)
  •  Montenegro (alongside 122 for Police, 123 for Fire and 124 for Ambulance)
  •  Netherlands (0900-8844 is the non-emergency number for any local police department)(In the Caribbean Netherlands 112 redirects to 911, whereas in the European Netherlands 911 redirects to 112)
  •  North Macedonia (alongside 192 for Police, 193 for Fire, 194 for Ambulance)
  •  Norway (112 for Police only, 110 for Fire and 113 for Ambulance. Calls to any of the emergency numbers will be redirected to appropriate service when needed. 02800 is the non-emergency number for any local police department)
  •  Poland (its used alongside 999 for Ambulance, 998 for Fire, and 997 for Police; both options are available; 112 is used for all emergencies)
  •  Romania
  •  Portugal (117 for reporting forest fires)
  •  Russia (alongside 101 for Fire, 102 for Police, 103 for Ambulance and 104 for Emergency gas service)
  •  Serbia (alongside 192 for Police, 193 for Fire, and 194 for Ambulance)
  •  Slovakia (alongside 155 for Ambulance, 158 for Police, 150 for Fire and 18300 for Mountain Rescue Service)
  •  Slovenia (alongside 113 for Police)
  •  Spain (alongside 091/062/092 for Police, 061 for Ambulance and 080 and 085 (in some provincial consortium) for Fire)
  •  Sweden (alongside 114 14 Police number for non-urgent matters)
  •   Switzerland (alongside 117 for Police, 144 for Ambulance and 118 for Fire)
  •  Turkey
  •  Ukraine (alongside 101 for Fire, 102 for Police, 103 for Ambulance and 104 for Emergency gas service; in some cities 112 and 911 are additionally for all emergencies)
  •  United Kingdom (alongside 999)
  •   Vatican City (alongside 113 for National Police, 115 for Fire and 118 for Ambulance)

North America[change | change source]

  •  Canada (redirects to 911 on certain phone operating systems only)
  •  Costa Rica (alongside 911)
  •  Dominican Republic (alongside 911)
  •  Panama (alongside 911; 104 for Police and 103 for Fire)
  •  United States (alongside 911, 112 forwards to 911 on GSM carriers only, including AT&T and T-Mobile.)
  •  Mexico (alongside 911)

Oceania[change | change source]

South America[change | change source]

  •  Argentina (alongside 911)
  •  Brazil (alongside 911; redirects to 190 – Military Police – alongside 193 for Fire, 190 for Military Police, and 192 for Ambulance)
  •  Chile (alongside 911; redirects to 133 - police)
  •  Colombia (Police only; alongside 123 for all emergencies, 125 for Ambulance and 119 for Fire)
  •  Ecuador (alongside 911)

References[change | change source]

  1. "Ghana announces 112 as new general emergency number". 3news.com. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
  2. "Emergency Telephone Numbers Around the World". ChartsBin.
  3. "Communication and Informatics Ministry (Kemenkominfo) made a call center for emergency responses at 112". indonesia.go.id. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  4. sanduir (8 May 2013). "112 in Belgium". Digital Single Market - European Commission. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  5. sanduir (11 February 2013). "112 in Bulgaria". Digital Single Market - European Commission. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  6. sanduir (11 February 2013). "112 in the Czech Republic". Digital Single Market - European Commission. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  7. sanduir (11 February 2013). "112 in Denmark". Digital Single Market - European Commission. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  8. For more information, see list of provinces
  9. ȘTIRILE, PUBLIKA.MD - AICI SUNT (29 June 2018). "112 service will be more efficient on emergency calls".
  10. "Dialling 911 instead of 111 still does the trick". Stuff. Retrieved 2018-07-26.

Related pages[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]