20th Century Studios

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20th Century Studios, Inc.
20th Century Studios
Formerly
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation (20th Century-Fox)
(1935–1985)
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation (20th Century Fox)
(1985–2020)
Subsidiary
IndustryFilm
Predecessors
FoundedMay 31, 1935; 86 years ago (1935-05-31)
Founders
HeadquartersFox Studio Lot Building 88, 10201 West Pico Boulevard, ,
United States
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Steve Asbell (president)
ProductsMotion pictures, television films
Number of employees
2,300 (2018)
ParentWalt Disney Studios
Divisions
Subsidiaries
Websitewww.20thcenturystudios.com
Footnotes / references
[1][2][3][4]

20th Century Studios, Inc. (formerly known from 1914 to 1931 as Fox Film, 1933 to 1935 as 20th Century Pictures 1935 to 1985 and 1985 to 2020 (and informally) as Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation or Twentieth Century Fox or 20th Century Fox Film Corporation) is a large American company that makes movies ("motion picture studio"). It is in the Century City area of Los Angeles, California, USA, just west of Beverly Hills.

Before 2013, 20th Century Fox was a subsidiary of News Corporation before it was split into two companies. After that, one of those companies, 21st Century Fox, became the studio's owner. On December 14, 2017, The Walt Disney Company said that it has acquired many of 21st Century Fox's subsidiaries, including 20th Century Fox. Thus, the studio is now owned by Disney and became 20th Century Studios.

20th Century Studios was formed in 1935 when Fox Film Corporation and Twentieth Century Pictures joined together to form the company. 20th Century Fox Television is a part of the company that makes television series.

History of 20th Century Studios[change | change source]

In 1935, Twentieth Century Pictures, Inc. and Fox Film Corporation merged together to form "Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation" (the hyphen between "Century" and "Fox" was dropped in 1985), or simply "20th Century Fox". During the Golden Age of Hollywood it was one of the "Big Five" studios (the other were MGM, Paramount Pictures, RKO Radio Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures). From 2013-2019, it was a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox Inc., which was a company formed when News Corporation split up into two companies. As of July 2018, their two most financially successful films are Avatar, released in 2009, and Titanic (under international rights), released in 1997. Both films were directed by James Cameron. Fox's most highly acclaimed film, according to review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes (jointly owned by Universal and Warner Bros.), is All About Eve, released in 1950 and directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. In December 2017, Disney announced its plans to buy most of 21st Century Fox's assets, which included a bidding war with Comcast; the acquisition process was completed on March 20, 2019, with the last pre-Disney release from the studio being Alita: Battle Angel, released on February 14, 2019. The remaining assets Disney didn't acquire, notably the Fox network and Fox News, were spun-off into a new company called Fox Corporation. On January 17, 2020, Disney announced that it would be dropping the word "Fox" from the company name, presumably to avoid confusion with Fox Corporation, renaming it to "Twentieth Century Studios," along with Searchlight Pictures. However, the studio was still legally incorporated and traded as Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation until December 4, 2020. As of December 4, 2020, the company has been using 20th Century Studios, Inc. as copyright for 20th Century Studios and Searchlight Pictures, while the company has been using 20th Television, Inc. for the copyright of 20th Television productions as a Disney subsidiary.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. D'Alessandro, Anthony (October 18, 2018). "Disney Finalizes Film Studio Brass Under Alan Horn: Emma Watts Confirmed To Run Fox". Deadline. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  2. "It's Getting Awkward at Fox's Movie Studio as Disney Deal Looms". The Wall Street Journal. August 10, 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  3. Szalai, Georg; Bond, Paul (March 20, 2019). "Disney Closes $71.3 Billion Fox Deal, Creating Global Content Powerhouse". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  4. McClintock, Pamela; Bond, Paul (February 6, 2019). "Anxiety, AWOL Executives and "Bloodshed": How Disney Is Making 21st Century Fox Disappear". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved August 13, 2019.

Other websites[change | change source]