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Abdul-Malik al-Houthi

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Abdul-Malik al-Houthi
Abu Jibril
عبدالملك بدرالدين الحوثي
Leader of Ansar Allah
Assumed office
10 September 2004
Preceded byHussein al-Houthi
Personal details
Born
Abdul-Malik al-Houthi

(1979-05-22) 22 May 1979 (age 45)
Saada Governorate, North Yemen[1]
FatherBadreddin al-Houthi
RelativesHussein Badreddin al-Houthi (brother)
Yahia al-Houthi (brother)
OccupationPolitician
ReligionShia Islam
Military service
Allegiance Yemen
Branch/serviceHouthis
Years of service2004–present
RankCommander
Battles/warsHouthi insurgency in Yemen
Yemeni Civil War (2014–present)

Abdul-Malik Badruldeen al-Houthi (Arabic: عبد الملك بدر الدين الحوثي, romanized: ʻAbd al-Malik Badr al-Dīn al-Ḥūthī) or Abu Jibril is a Yemeni politician and religious leader who serves as the leader of the Houthi movement, a revolutionary movement principally made up of Zaidi Muslims. His brothers Yahia and Abdul-Karim are also leaders of the group, as were his late brothers Hussein, Ibrahim,[2] and Abdulkhaliq.[3][4][5][6][7] Abdul-Malik Houthi is the leading figure in the Yemeni Civil War which started with the Houthi takeover in Yemen in the Saada Governorate in northern Yemen.

References

[change | change source]
  1. Peterson, J.E. (2008). "The al-Huthi Conflict in Yemen" (PDF). Arabian Peninsula Background Note. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 25, 2012. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  2. "Clashes in southern Yemen; rebels leader's brother killed". Globe and Mail. Associated Press. 9 August 2019. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  3. "Brother of Houthis' top leader believed dead after air strike". The National (Abu Dhabi). 1 September 2018. Retrieved 14 May 2020.
  4. Yemeni rebel leader denies seeking Shi'ite state. Mail & Guardian. 29 September 2009.
  5. Almasmari, Hakim (6 September 2009). "My Group", Abdul Malik Al-Houthi. Yemen Post.
  6. Iran urges all sides to end Yemen conflict Archived November 29, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. İslâmi Davet. 24 November 2009.
  7. the 500 most influential muslim,p.166.2009,ed by John Esposito & Ebrahim Kalin