Adobe Premiere Pro

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Adobe Premiere Pro
Light purple text saying ¨Pr¨ on a curved purple background
Other namesAdobe Premiere Pro CC
Original author(s)Adobe Inc
Initial release23 September 2003; 18 years ago (2003-09-23)
Stable release
22.2 / 7 February 2022; 4 months ago (2022-02-07)
Written inC++
PredecessorAdobe Premiere
TypeVideo editing software
LicenseTrialware
Websitewww.adobe.com/products/premiere.html
As ofMarch 2022

Adobe Premiere Pro CC (CC stands for Creative Cloud) is a video editing software. It was created by Adobe Inc. The software was first released in 2003. Premiere Pro lets users edit videos. For example, words can be added to the video or the speed of the video can be changed.[1] The software is based on Adobe Premiere.

The original Adobe Premiere was released in 1991. It was replaced by Premiere Pro in 2002 as part of Adobe's change to Creative Cloud.

Adobe Premiere Elements was released in 2013 as a simpler version of Premiere Pro. It is easier to learn and good for beginner editors.[2]

Features[change | change source]

Premiere Pro lets users add effects to videos and images. Users can remove certain colors from the video. This is called chroma keying.[3] Premiere Pro can edit videos at up to 32,768 x 32,768 pixels.[4] Keyframing is a feature that makes effects change over time. For example, making a video move to a different place or make the video smaller over time.[5]

Editing[change | change source]

When editing in Premiere Pro, the user can import video, audio and images, and use the software to create new, edited versions of videos which can be exported to the users files directly using Adobe Media Encoder.[6] When creating videos in Premiere Pro, different videos, images and sounds can be edited together. Text can be added, and the user can change the font, size, and color of the text. Filters can be added to videos, images, and audio.

Keyframing[change | change source]

Keyframing is making a starting and ending point in an animation.[7] Premiere Pro uses Keyframe interpolation to fill in the points in between the two keyframes.[8]

Reception[change | change source]

Upon release, Premiere Pro was used to make many movies. Premiere Pro has received universal acclaim and is considered by some to be the best editing software of all time,[9][10] rated 4.5/5 by PCMag.[11][examples needed] Premiere Pro has received criticism because it is complex, as well as its price of US$20.99 a month.[10]

Popular uses[change | change source]

Premiere Pro was been used to make well known movies, including Deadpool[12] and Avatar.[13] Premiere Pro was also used to edit Act of Valor,[14] A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman,[15] Superman Returns,[16] Terminator: Dark Fate,[17] Dust to Glory and Sharknado 2.[18]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Professional video editing software | Adobe Premiere Pro". www.adobe.com. Archived from the original on March 27, 2022. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  2. "Premiere Pro vs. Premiere Elements | Adobe". www.adobe.com. Archived from the original on March 7, 2022. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  3. "How to Edit Green Screen Video in Adobe Premiere Pro". Online Tech Tips. March 2, 2022. Archived from the original on March 13, 2022. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  4. "Import individual still images, or a series of still images as a sequence from other Adobe applications such as Photoshop or Illustrator". Adobe. January 27, 2022. Archived from the original on October 28, 2021. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  5. "Animating effects". Adobe. December 22, 2021. Archived from the original on October 26, 2021. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  6. "Workflow and overview for exporting". Adobe. September 10, 2021. Archived from the original on January 21, 2022. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  7. "Animating effects". Adobe. December 22, 2021. Archived from the original on October 26, 2021. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  8. "Keyframe Interpolation". Adobe. April 26, 2021. Archived from the original on November 18, 2021. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  9. Tom May (February 19, 2022). "The best video editing software in 2022". Creative Bloq. Archived from the original on March 24, 2022. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Rigg, Christian; published, Jackie Dove (January 13, 2022). "Best video editing software 2022". Tom's Guide. Archived from the original on December 16, 2021. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  11. "The Best Video Editing Software for 2022". PCMAG. Archived from the original on March 27, 2022. Retrieved March 29, 2022.
  12. ""Deadpool" comes alive with explosive action and dark comedy | Creative Cloud blog by Adobe". Adobe Creative Cloud. Archived from the original on July 9, 2017. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  13. "Avatar: the filmmaking future is now" (PDF). Adobe Systems. January 7, 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 29, 2012. Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  14. "Bandito Brothers/Act of Valor: Larger than life" (PDF). Adobe Systems. February 28, 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 5, 2016. Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  15. ""A Liar's Autobiography" Filmmakers Switch to All Adobe Workflow for Tribute to Monty Python Member", Pro Video Coalition, September 8, 2012, archived from the original on January 18, 2013, retrieved January 25, 2013
  16. "COVER STORY: 'SUPERMAN RETURNS'". Post Magazine. Archived from the original on December 31, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  17. Working with Premiere Pro on Terminator: Dark Fate, November 1, 2019, archived from the original on March 9, 2022, retrieved March 28, 2022
  18. "Sharknado 2 and Vashi's Premiere Pro Editorial Workflow", Pro Video Coalition, July 29, 2014, archived from the original on August 1, 2014, retrieved August 21, 2014

Other websites[change | change source]

Official website