Aguascalientes City

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Aguascalientes
Ciudad de Aguascalientes
City of Aguascalientes
Clockwise from top: San Antonio de Padua Church, La Exedra, Aguascalientes Theatre, Cerro del Muerto, Plaza Bosques Tower, and the San Marcos Park.
Clockwise from top: San Antonio de Padua Church, La Exedra, Aguascalientes Theatre, Cerro del Muerto, Plaza Bosques Tower, and the San Marcos Park.
Flag of Aguascalientes
Coat of arms of Aguascalientes
Nickname(s): 
Spanish: Ciudad de la gente buena
(English: City of the good people)
Motto(s): 
Latin: Virtus in Aquis, Fidelitas in Pectoribus
(English: Virtue in the Water, Fidelity in the Heart)
Location of Aguascalientes within the state
Location of Aguascalientes within the state
Location of the state of Aguascalientes
Location of the state of Aguascalientes
Coordinates: 21°52′33.6″N 102°17′45.6″W / 21.876000°N 102.296000°W / 21.876000; -102.296000Coordinates: 21°52′33.6″N 102°17′45.6″W / 21.876000°N 102.296000°W / 21.876000; -102.296000
CountryMexico Mexico
StateAguascalientes Aguascalientes
MunicipalityAguascalientes
FoundedOctober 22, 1575
Founded asVilla de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de las Aguas Calientes
Founded byJuan de Montoro Rodríguez
Jerónimo de Orozco
Government
 • MayorMaría Teresa Jiménez Esquivel
Area
 • City385 km2 (149 sq mi)
Elevation
1,888 m (6,194 ft)
Population
 (2012)
 • City934,424
 • Density2,400/km2 (6,300/sq mi)
 • Metro
1,225,432
Demonymshidrocálido, aguascalentense
Time zoneUTC−6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Postal code
20000-20999
Area code(s)449
Federal RoutesCarretera federal 45.svg Carretera federal 70.svg
Websitehttp://www.ags.gob.mx

Aguascalientes (Spanish pronunciation: [ˌaɣwaskaˈljentes] (audio speaker iconlisten)) is the capital of the state of Aguascalientes. It is its biggest city. One million people live in the Metropolitan area.[1] It is located in North-Central Mexico. It is part of the macroregion of Bajío,[2] which is among the safest and most prosperous regions in Mexico. It was part of the kingdom of Nueva Galicia. In 1835 Aguascalientes became the capital of the Free and Sovereign State of Aguascalientes.[3] Aguascalientes has been called the cleanest city in Latin America.[4] Aguascalientes has a population which includes Japanese, Koreans, and Germans.

It stands on the banks of the Aguascalientes river, 1880 meters above sea level, at 21°51′N 102°18′W / 21.850°N 102.300°W / 21.850; -102.300. It is the municipal seat for the Aguascalientes Municipality. The Aguascalientes metropolitan area includes the municipality of Jesús María and San Francisco de los Romo. It was a Chichimeca Indian territory. It later blossomed as a strategic link between Mexico City and the mines of Zacatecas, while prosperous agriculture and ranching helped feed Spain's emerging New World cities.[5]

OECD has recognized that Aguascalientes has a good business climate.[6] It is a strong business and economic center in the Bajío region.[7] Its strategic location and infrastructure have made it a regional hub and a location for international headquarters.[7] Also home to two of Nissan's largest and most important manufacturing plants in Latin America. Other important companies located in Aguascalientes include Jatco, Coca-Cola, Flextronics, Texas Instruments, Donaldson, and Calsonic Kansei.

Because of its services and hotel industry, Aguascalientes is one of the most important centers in Mexico for entertainment, gastronomy, leisure activities, arts and recreation.[8]

References[change | change source]

  1. Javier Rodríguez Lozano. "En estos días Aguascalientes llegará al millón de habitantes - La Jornada Aguascalientes (LJA.mx)". La Jornada Aguascalientes (LJA.mx). Archived from the original on 20 August 2019. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  2. "Bajío, el nuevo milagro mexicano - T21". T21. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  3. "Historia de la Ciudad de Aguascalientes". Ags.itesm.mx. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  4. "Aguascalientes, la ciudad más limpia de Latinoamérica". El Informador. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  5. "Aguascalientes, traditional city in Mexico". Visitmexico.com. Archived from the original on 13 May 2012. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  6. "Archived copy". Archived from the original (PDF) on 2020-03-09. Retrieved 2020-02-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Se ofertan mil empleos a jóvenes en Aguascalientes". Desdelared.com.mx. 13 August 2012. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  8. "Aguascalientes recibió a 187 mil turistas este verano". Desdelared.com.mx. 27 August 2012. Retrieved 7 September 2014.