Alan Moore

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Alan Moore
Alan Moore on 2 February 2008
Alan Moore on 2 February 2008
Born (1953-11-18) 18 November 1953 (age 65)
Northampton, England,
United Kingdom
Pen nameCurt Vile, Jill de Ray,
Translucia Baboon,
The Original Writer
OccupationComics writer, novelist,
short story writer, musician, cartoonist, magician, occultist
GenreScience fiction, fiction,
non-fiction, superhero, horror
Notable worksBatman: The Killing Joke
From Hell
Jerusalem
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
The Ballad of Halo Jones
Lost Girls
Marvelman
Promethea
Swamp Thing
V for Vendetta
Voice of the Fire
Watchmen
Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
For the Man Who Has Everything
Spouse
Children

Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953[1] in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell.[2]

Awards and recognition[change | change source]

  • A number of Jack Kirby Awards
  • Nominated for the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Awards several times, winning for Favorite Writer in 1985, 1986, 1987, 1999, and 2000.
  • CBG Fan Award for Favorite Comic Book Story (Watchmen) in 1987 and Favorite Original Graphic Novel or Album (Batman: The Killing Joke with Brian Bolland) in 1988.
  • Harvey Award for Best Writer for 1988 (for Watchmen), for 1995 and 1996 (for From Hell), for 1999 (for his body of work, including From Hell and Supreme), for 2000 (for The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen), and for 2001 and 2003 (for Promethea).
  • Eisner Award for Best Writer nine times, since 1988.
  • In 1988, Moore and artist Dave Gibbons won a Hugo Award in the category Other Forms for Watchmen. The category was created for that year only, via a rarely-used provision that allows the Committee of the Worldcon to create any temporary Additional Category it feels appropriate (no subsequent committee has chosen to repeat this category).[3]
  • In 2005, Watchmen had the honour of being the only Graphic Novel to make it onto Time Magazine's "All-Time 100 Novels" list.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. Comics Buyers Guide #1636 (December 2007); Page 135
  2. "Alan Moore tml Interview - Alan Moore, BBC - Movies, accessed 10 February 2007
  3. "Hugo Award Winners from the 1980s".
  4. "Time Magazine's All-Time 100 Novels".

Other websites[change | change source]