Alicia Markova

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Dame Alicia Markova DBE
Alicia Markova.jpg
Markova in 1940
Born Lilian Alicia Marks
(1910-12-01)1 December 1910
London, England, UK
Died 2 December 2004(2004-12-02) (aged 94)
Bath, Somerset, England, UK
Nationality British
Occupation Ballerina
Title Prima ballerina assoluta and theatre company director

Alicia Markova DBE (Lilian Alicia Marks, 1 December 1910 – 2 December 2004) was an English ballerina and choreographer. She also directed and taught ballet. She was the first British dancer to become the prima ballerina of a ballet company.[1]

Markova was born and raised in London. She was a founder dancer of the Ballet Rambert (1931/5), the Vic-Wells Ballet (193/5), Markova-Dolin Company (1935/8), danced for the American Ballet Theatre (1941/5), and was co-founder and director of the English National Ballet. She toured with Dolin after the war until 1949. Her last period as a dancer came with the London Festival Ballet, which became the English National Ballet. She retired from professional dancing in January 1963 at fifty-two.

Markova was born Lillian Alicia Marks in London, England. She changed her name to fit in with the fashion of the time. Markova died at ninety-four in Bath, Somerset, of a stroke.

Life[change | change source]

Markova's father was Jewish, and her mother converted to the faith. She began studying ballet with Princess Serafina Astafieva, a Russian ballerina living in London. Astafieva was a retired dancer of the Ballets Russes, a renowned ballet company founded by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev.

At 13, Markova was seen in class by Diaghilev, who was visiting London in search of new talent. He invited her to join the Ballets Russes in Monte Carlo, which she did in 1925, a month after her 14th birthday. She danced roles which were specially choreographed for her. She met some of the leading 20th century figures who worked with the company. They included Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Igor Stravinsky, Sergei Prokofiev, Léonide Massine, George Balanchine, and Bronislava Nijinska.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Crane, Debra & Mackrill, Judith 2000. The Oxford dictionary of dance. Oxford University Press, p315/6. ISBN 0-19-860106-9