Anne Graham Lotz

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Anne Graham Lotz
Anne Graham Lotz (October 2008).jpg
Anne in 2008.
Born (1948-05-29) May 29, 1948 (age 74)
OccupationEvangelist, Author
Spouse(s)Daniel Lotz (died 2015)
Children3
Parent(s)Billy Graham, Ruth Graham
Websitehttp://www.annegrahamlotz.com/
Signature
Anne Graham Lotz signature.png

Anne McCue Graham Lotz is an American protestant evangelist. She is the 2nd daughter of the evangelist, Billy Graham, and his wife Ruth Graham. She founded AnGeL ministries. She is the author of more than 10 books. Her most known book is "Just Give Me Jesus".

Early Life[change | change source]

Anne McCue Graham Lotz was born in 1948 in Montreat, North Carolina. Anne is the 2nd child of the five children born to Billy Graham and Ruth Graham.[1] The Graham Family had settled near Ruth's parents in Montreat. It remains today as the Graham Family Home, Little Piney Cove.

Ruth was often the single parent for months at a time to the 5 Graham children. Of her caring and teaching to the children, Anne says, "My father, was away almost full time. I was raised pretty much by single parents and grandparents, and then I didn't know any different."[2]

Anne became a Christian at the age of about 8 years old after watching The King of Kings, a Cecil B. DeMille film, on Good Friday.

Anne Graham graduated from high school. Shortly after that, she married Dr. Daniel Lotz on September 9, 1966, at the age of 18.[3] The young couple lived in Raleigh, North Carolina. This is where Dr. Lotz was beginning his dental practice. She had her first child at the age of 20, two more children in the three years that followed. She did not work outside her home. Anne says this was a hard time in her life saying: “Early in my marriage, I felt like I drifted from God just because I was busy – you know, small children, small house, all the business of being a housewife. But I sought God through the Scripture. That’s when I got into the Bible myself.”

Early Ministry: Bible Study Fellowship[change | change source]

In 1975, Lotz heard about Bible Study Fellowship, a Bible class for women that used a highly structured study method. She wanted a class to be offered in her hometown of Raleigh. She waited for a year for someone else to teach the class. Although no one else did, so she decided to teach the class herself. The class quickly filled up with 500 people and had a waiting list.[4] Lotz continued to teach the weekly class for 12 years. During this time, she began to receive many speaking invitations. In 1988, Anne left Bible Study Fellowship traveling from place to place to find a teaching ministry.

AnGeL Ministries[change | change source]

Upon leaving her Bible Study Fellowship teaching class afterwards Anne founded AnGeL Ministries, a non-profit organization based in Raleigh, NC to fasten her ability to accept teaching invitations. Lotz says the name "AnGeL Ministries" takes her initials "AGL" and adds the "n" and "e" to form the word "AnGeL", "because angels in the Bible were messengers of God, and they went where God sent them and they give the message you put on their heart, and I felt that describes what I do."

In the early years of AnGeL Ministries, Anne accepted invitations to speak all over the world: at priest's conferences, at women's conferences, and world evangelism conferences. By the year 2000, she felt her ministry taking a different direction.

Although as a female evangelist she had some resistance from conservative Protestants, her popularity is such large that she gets crowded by fans in the whole world. The New York Times in 1999 considered her one of the five most influential evangelists in the United States.

References[change | change source]

  1. Zoba, Wendy Murray. "Billy's Rib". ChristianityToday.com. Retrieved 2022-10-24.
  2. "CNN.com - Transcripts". transcripts.cnn.com. Retrieved 2022-10-24.
  3. "- TIME". web.archive.org. 2008-02-20. Archived from the original on 2010-10-28. Retrieved 2022-10-24.
  4. "UNC-TV:North Carolina People - The Best of People". web.archive.org. 2010-09-06. Archived from the original on 2010-09-06. Retrieved 2022-10-24.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)