Anthony Kennedy

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Anthony Kennedy
Anthony Kennedy official SCOTUS portrait.jpg
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
Assumed office
February 18, 1988
Nominated by Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Lewis Powell
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
In office
May 30, 1975 – February 18, 1988
Nominated by Gerald Ford
Preceded by Charles Merrill
Succeeded by Pamela Rymer
Personal details
Born Anthony McLeod Kennedy
July 23, 1936 (1936-07-23) (age 80)
Sacramento, California, U.S.
Political party Republican[1]
Spouse(s) Mary Davis (1963–present)
Children 3
Education Stanford University (BA)
Harvard University (LLB) London School of Economics
Signature
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch California Army National Guard
United States Army National Guard
Years of service 1961

Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) is the senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was nominated by President Ronald Reagan on November 11, 1987, and took the oath of office on February 18, 1988.

Kennedy became the most senior Associate Justice on the court following the death of Antonin Scalia in February 2016.[2][3] Since the retirement of Sandra Day O'Connor in 2006, he has been the swing vote on many of the Court's 5–4 decisions.[4][5][6][7] He has authored the majority ruling in many of these cases, including Lawrence v. Texas, Boumediene v. Bush, Citizens United v. FEC, and Obergefell v. Hodges.

Background[change | change source]

Kennedy was born in Sacramento, California, on July 23, 1936. He went to Harvard University, Stanford University, and the London School of Economics. He was a private lawyer, a professor, and in 1975, he was appointed by Gerald Ford to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1988, Ronald Reagan nominated him for the Supreme Court. He became a member of the court on February 18, 1988. He has two sons and a daughter.

References[change | change source]

  1. The Supreme Court Compendium: Data, Decisions, and Developments
  2. The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2016. 2015. p. 823. https://books.google.com/books?id=72kMCAAAQBAJ&pg=PA823-IA112.
  3. Williams, Pete (February 22, 2016). "Supreme Court Holds First Session After Justice Scalia's Death". NBC News. http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/supreme-court-holds-first-session-after-justice-scalia-s-death-n523611.
  4. Bravin, Jess, Court Conservatives Prevail June 28, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2013.
  5. Jeffrey Toobin, The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court (2010) p. 198
  6. Steffen W. Schmidt et al. American Government & Politics Today (2008) p. 547
  7. Jeffrey Rosen, "Courting Controversy", Time June 28, 2007