Aromanians

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Aromanians
Armãnji, Rrãmãnji
Total population
c. 250,000 (Aromanian-speakers)[1]
Languages
Aromanian
Religion
Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Related ethnic groups
Other Latin-speaking peoples;
(most notably Romanians, Moldovans, Megleno-Romanians, and Istro-Romanians)

The Aromanians (Aromanian: Armãnji, Rrãmãnji) are an ethnic group who speak an Eastern Romance language and are native to the southern Balkans.[2] They are the descendants of Latin-speaking Greeks from areas of Ancient Greece like Macedonia.[3][4]

References[change | change source]

Citations[change | change source]

  1. Puig, Lluis Maria de (17 January 1997). "Report: Aromanians". Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly. Doc. 7728.
  2. Mantouvalos 2017, p. 30: "The Aromanians (Vlachs) are a Latin-speaking ethnic group native to the southern Balkans."
  3. Liakos 1965.
  4. Charanis 1976, p. 16: "[A]ccording to one scholar, Latin had made such an inroad into Macedonia that that province had become perhaps bilingual. This lends some support to the view held by Greek scholars, that the Vlachs now in that country are actually the descendants of Latinized Macedonians and as a consequence Greeks by origin."

Sources[change | change source]

  • Charanis, Peter. "The Slavs, Byzantium, and the Historical Significance of the First Bulgarian Kingdom". Balkan Studies. 17 (1): 5–24.
  • Liakos, Socrates N. (1965). Η ΚΑΤΑΓΩΓΗ ΤΩΝ ΒΛΑΧΩΝ Η ΑΡΜΑΝΙΩΝ [THE ORIGIN OF THE VLACHS OR AROMANIANS] (in Greek). Thessaloniki: ΜΙΚΡΕΥΡΩΠΑΙΚΕΣ (ΒΑΛΚΑΝΙΚΕΣ) ΜΕΛΕΤΕΣ.
  • Mantouvalos, Ikaros (2017). "Greek Immigrants in Central Europe: A Concise Study of Migration Routes from the Balkans to the Territories of the Hungarian Kingdom (From the Late 17th to the Early 19th Centuries)". In Katsiardi-Hering, Olga; Stassinopoulou, Olga (eds.). Across the Danube: Southeastern Europeans and Their Travelling Identities (17th–19th C.). Leiden and Boston: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-33544-8.