Asahi Shinbun

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The Asahi Shimbun
The Asahi Shimbun logo.svg
Asahi-Shimbun-First-Issue-Front-Page-January 25-1879.png
First issue on 25 January 1879
TypeDaily newspaper
Company type: Private
FormatBroadsheet[1]
Owner(s)Repurchased shares (25%)
Murayama family (21.02%; 10% through the KOSETSU Museum of Art)
Ueno family (total 14.22% by Shōichi Ueno's death in 2016)
TV Asahi (11.88%)
Toppan (7.31%)
Asahi Broadcasting Group Holdcorp (2.31%)
Founder(s)Murayama Ryōhei [ja]
Ueno Riichi [ja]
Founded25 January 1879
Political alignmentCentre-left[2][3][4][5][6]
Liberalism[7][8]
HeadquartersNakanoshima, Kita-ku, Osaka, Japan
CountryJapan
Circulation
  • Decrease 5,160,355 (2020)[9]
  • Decrease 5,954,336 (2018)[10]
  • Decrease 6,572,195 (2016)[11]
  • 7,960,000 (2010)[12]
Websitewww.asahi.com (Japanese)
www.asahi.com/ajw (English)
Flag of the Asahi Shimbun Company

Asahi Shinbun (Morning Sun Newspaper) is a major newspaper in Japan. It is based in Osaka. It started in 1879. It is left-wing. It publishes a daily English-language edition online.

Note[change | change source]

  1. "数字で見る朝日新聞". Asahi. Retrieved 31 March 2011.
  2. "Japan paper Yomiuri Shimbun retracts 'sex slaves' references". BBC News. 28 November 2014. Retrieved 21 February 2020. In August the left-of-centre Asahi newspaper retracted a series of articles it had published about the comfort women issue based on the testimony of a Japanese author Seiji Yoshida.
  3. "The press in Japan - Gotcha". The Economist. 20 September 2014. Retrieved 21 February 2020. The Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading left-of-centre newspaper, with a circulation of 7.3m, is battling for its reputation after a third embarrassing ...
  4. "Japan PM to overturn pacifist defence policy". The Guardian. 30 June 2014. Retrieved 21 February 2020. The left-of-centre Asahi Shimbun accused Abe of abandoning Japan's postwar pacifism after minimal public debate.
  5. Saul J. Takahashi (2019). Civil and Political Rights in Japan: A Tribute to Sir Nigel Rodley. "... affiliated with the left of centre newspaper Asahi Shimbun, has been a particular target."
  6. "Japan's Asahi newspaper sacks editor over Fukushima report errors". Financial Times. 12 September 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2020.
  7. "Asahi Shimbun". Britannica. The paper is known for its liberal and progressive views.
  8. Fackler, Martin (2016-05-27). "The Silencing of Japan's Free Press". Foreign Policy. Retrieved 2020-03-05. That announcement capped a difficult year-and-a-half for independent media that saw the largest liberal newspaper, the Asahi Shimbun, subdued and other critical commentators removed from the airwaves.
  9. 朝日新聞媒体資料 Data File 2021 [Asahi Shimbun Media Resources Data File 2021] (PDF) (in Japanese). The Asahi Shimbun. 4 January 2021. p. 7. Retrieved 11 March 2021.
  10. "Strength of The Asahi Shimbun 2018" (PDF). The Asahi Shimbun. Retrieved 11 March 2021.
  11. "朝日新聞、4年間で発行部数105万減の衝撃…新聞業界、存亡の危機突入へ". biz-journal.
  12. "全国紙の朝・夕刊別販売部数(単位:部)". Yomiuri. Archived from the original on 17 July 2011. Retrieved 31 March 2011.

Other websites[change | change source]