Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

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Assassination of Archduke
Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg
DC-1914-27-d-Sarajevo-cropped.jpg
Assassination illustrated in the Italian newspaper Domenica del Corriere, 12 July 1914 by Achille Beltrame
Location Near the Latin Bridge, Sarajevo (43°51′29″N 18°25′44″E / 43.857917°N 18.42875°E / 43.857917; 18.42875)
Date 28 June 1914

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir presumptive to the throne of Austria-Hungary, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, happened on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo. They were shot dead by Gavrilo Princip.

Princip was one of a group of six assassins (five from Serbia and one from Bosnia). The leader was Danilo Ilić, a member of the Black Hand secret society. The political reason for the assassination was to break off Austria-Hungary's South Slav provinces so they could be combined into a new country, Yugoslavia.

This soon led to the outbreak of war in Europe at the end of July 1914.[1] Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Both country's allies became involved in the war, and soon most of Europe became involved.

References[change | change source]

  1. "First World War.com Primary Documents: Archduke Franz Ferdinand's Assassination, 28 June 1914". 2002-11-03. Retrieved 2016-10-09.