Bhojpuri Language

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Bhojpuri
भोजपुरी  • 𑂦𑂷𑂔𑂣𑂳𑂩𑂲
Kaithi.jpg
Bhojpuri word in devanagari script.jpg
The word "Bhojpuri" in Kaithi and Devanagari script
Native toIndia and Nepal
RegionPurvanchal-Bhojpur
EthnicityBhojpuri
Native speakers
51 million, partial count (2011 census)[1]
(additional speakers counted under Hindi)
Dialects
  • Northern (Gorakhpuri, Sarawaria, Basti, Padrauna)
  • Western (Purbi, Benarsi)
  • Southern (Kharwari)
  • Nagpuria (Sadari)
  • Tharu Bhojpuri
  • Madheshi
  • Domra
  • Musahari
  • Caribbean Hindustani
     · Trinidadian Hindustani
    (Trinidadian Bhojpuri,
    Plantation Hindustani,
    Gaon ke Bolee)
     · Guyanese Hindustani
    (Aili Gaili)
     · Sarnami Hindoestani
  • Fiji Hindi
  • Mauritian Bhojpuri
  • South African Bhojpuri (Naitali)[2]
Official status
Official language in
 Fiji (as the Fiji Hindi language)
Recognised minority
language in
 India (as a second language in Jharkhand)[3]
Language codes
ISO 639-2bho
ISO 639-3bhoinclusive code
Individual codes:
hns – Caribbean Hindustani
hif – Fiji Hindi
Glottologbhoj1246[4]
Linguasphere59-AAF-sa
Bhojpuri Speaking Region in India.png
Bhojpuri-speaking region in India
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For a guide to IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Bhojpuri Language is a language which is spoken in northern-eastern India and Terai of Nepal. It is mainly spoken in western Bihar and Eastern Uttar Pradesh.This language is written in Devanagari.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Statement 1: Abstract of speakers' strength of languages and mother tongues – 2011". www.censusindia.gov.in. Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  2. http://www.indiandiasporacouncil.org/pdf/NAITALI-SOUTH-AFRICAN-BHOJPURI-by-B-Rambilass.pdf
  3. Sudhir Kumar Mishra (22 March 2018). "Bhojpuri, 3 more to get official tag". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 22 March 2018.
  4. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Bhojpuric". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  5. "Wikipedia English". Wikipedia English. Cite has empty unknown parameter: |dead-url= (help)