Black-winged stilt

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Black-winged stilt
Himantopus himantopus - Pak Thale.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Charadriiformes
Family: Recurvirostridae
Genus: Himantopus
Species:
H. leucocephalus
Binomial name
Himantopus leucocephalus

The black-winged stilt or pied stilt (Himantopus himantopus) is a bird in the family Recurvirostridae. It lives in many places in the world: Australia, South America, Central America, Africa, southern Asia, some of North America, some of Europe, the Philippines, New Zealand, New Guinea, Indonesia, and the Solomon Islands.[1]

Appearance[change | change source]

This bird has black and white feathers. Its legs are long and orange. Its bill is straight and black. The irises of its eyes are red. They have gray feathers on their heads. The gray part gets bigger as the bird gets older.[1]

Habitat and food[change | change source]

This bird lives in mudflats, marshes, and the shores of lakes and rivers.[1]

This bird wades. It walks through shallow water on its long legs. It uses its beak to catch small animals with no spines off the top of the water. It can swim and put its head under the water to catch food, but it does not do this often. It eats insects, mollusks, and crustaceans. It can look for food in large flocks, groups of birds. The birds in the flock do not all have to be black-winged stilts. The black-winged stilt will look for food with banded stilts and red-necked avocets too.[1]

Breeding[change | change source]

Himantopus himantopus MHNT.jpg

Many pairs of black-winged stilts build nests near each other. This is called a colony. But each pair will fight other birds if they come too close to their nest. The birds either dig a small hole in the ground or put pieces of plants on the ground to make the nest. Both the male and female stilt sit on the eggs.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "Black-winged Stilt: Himantopus himantopus Recurvirostridae". Birdlife Australia. Retrieved September 8, 2021.