Black people

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Famous black people
”African nations”: Photography of Dark skinned Africans from the fourth edition of the German encyclopedia Meyers Konversation-Lexikon (1885–1890).

Black people is a term that is used for a racial group of people with a dark skin color. The meaning of the word is mainly used for people of sub-Saharan African descent. A meaning that also includes certain groups in Oceania and Southeast Asia.[note 1][1][2]

Europe

Black people in the United Kingdom are called Black British. They make up 3.3% of the people in the UK.[3]

South Africa

During apartheid people in South Africa were classified into four main races: : Black, White, Asian (mostly Indian), and Coloured. Under apartheid black people were treated the mostly badly. Coloured people were treated slightly less badly. In South Africa Chinese people who lived there during apartheid are classed as black.[4] About 80% of people in South Africa are Black African. The income of the average white South African household is six times as much as that of the average black South African household.[5] 14% of black South Africans have HIV. 0.3% of Indians and whites do.[6]

India and Pakistan

In India and Pakistan there are Siddi people.

United States

Black people can also have light skin because of illness. Michael Jackson, another American singer, was born with brown skin but his skin became light because of a disease called vitiligo. A black person may be called white by other black people if they do not associate themselves with black culture. White people may also be called black.

Notes

  1. Other isolated groups in Southeast Asia sometimes grouped as black include the Austronesians and Papuans, the Andamanese islanders, the Semang people of the Malay peninsula, the Aeta people of Luzon, and some other small populations of indigenous peoples.

References

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