Butanone

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Butanone[1]
Ball-and-stick model of butanone
Space-filling model of butanone
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Butan-2-one[2]
Other names
  • Ethyl methyl ketone[2]
  • Ethylmethylketone
  • Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK; deprecated[2])
  • Methylpropanone
  • Methylacetone
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Beilstein Reference 741880
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.054
Gmelin Reference 25656
KEGG
PubChem {{{value}}}
RTECS number EL6475000
UNII
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C4H8O
Molar mass 72.11 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Mint or acetone-like[3]
Density 0.8050 g/mL
Melting point −86 °C (−123 °F; 187 K)
Boiling point 79.64 °C (175.35 °F; 352.79 K)
27.5 g/100mL
log P 0.37[4]
Vapor pressure 78 mmHg (20 °C)[3]
Acidity (pKa) 14.7
−45.58·10−6 cm3/mol
1.37880
Viscosity 0.43 cP
Structure
2.76 D
Hazards
EU classification Flammable (F)
Irritant (Xi)
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

3
1
0
 
R-phrases R11 R36 R66 R67
S-phrases (S2) S9 S16
Explosive limits 1.4–11.4%[3]
U.S. Permissible
exposure limit (PEL)
TWA 200 ppm (590 mg/m3)[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Butanone, also called methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH3C(O)CH2CH3. It is a simple ketone with four carbon atoms. It smells sharp and sweet, like butterscotch and acetone mixed. It is soluble in water and is used as a solvent.

References[change | change source]

  1. Merck Index, 11th Edition, 5991.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry : IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). Cambridge: The Royal Society of Chemistry. 2014. p. 725. doi:10.1039/9781849733069-FP001. ISBN 978-0-85404-182-4.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0069". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  4. "butan-2-one_msds".