Carol Moseley Braun

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Carol Moseley Braun
Sen. Carol Moseley Braun.jpg
United States Ambassador to Samoa
In office
February 8, 2000 – March 1, 2001
PresidentBill Clinton
George W. Bush
Preceded byJoe Beeman
Succeeded byCharles Swindells
United States Ambassador to New Zealand
In office
December 15, 1999 – March 1, 2001
PresidentBill Clinton
George W. Bush
Preceded byJoe Beeman
Succeeded byCharles Swindells
United States Senator
from Illinois
In office
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1999
Preceded byAlan Dixon
Succeeded byPeter Fitzgerald
Recorder of Deeds of Cook County
In office
December 1, 1988 – December 1, 1992
Preceded byBus Yourell
Succeeded byJesse White
Member of the Illinois House of Representatives
from the 25th district
In office
January 12, 1983 – December 1, 1988
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byDonne Trotter
Member of the Illinois House of Representatives
from the 24th district
In office
January 5, 1979 – January 12, 1983
Preceded byRobert Mann
Succeeded byConstituency abolished
Personal details
Born
Carol Elizabeth Moseley

(1947-08-16) August 16, 1947 (age 71)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Michael Braun (1973–1986)
Children1
EducationUniversity of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
University of Illinois, Chicago (BA)
University of Chicago (JD)

Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun, also sometimes Moseley-Braun[1] (born August 16, 1947), is an American diplomat, politician and lawyer. She represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. She was the first female African-American Senator, the first African-American U.S. Senator for the Democratic Party, the first woman to defeat an incumbent U.S. Senator in an election, and the first female Senator from Illinois.

From 1999 until 2001, she was the United States Ambassador to New Zealand.

She was a candidate for the Democratic nomination during the 2004 U.S. presidential election.

Following the public announcement by Richard M. Daley that he would not seek re-election, in November 2010, Braun began her campaign for Mayor of Chicago.[2] She lost the election to Rahm Emanuel.

References[change | change source]

  1. Marja Mills, "The Humble Hyphen", Chicago Times, March 14, 2003, explaining that Moseley Braun adopted the hyphenation on joining the Senate and dropped it ten years late.
  2. Mitchell, Mary (September 14, 2010). "Trailblazing Moseley Braun set to run again". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on September 18, 2010. Retrieved September 18, 2010.