Cawker City, Kansas

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Cawker City, Kansas
Water Tower and Downtown (2012) (view from near the Ball of Twine)
Water Tower and Downtown (2012)
(view from near the Ball of Twine)
Location within Mitchell County and Kansas
Location within Mitchell County and Kansas
KDOT map of Mitchell County (legend)
Coordinates: 39°30′32″N 98°26′2″W / 39.50889°N 98.43389°W / 39.50889; -98.43389Coordinates: 39°30′32″N 98°26′2″W / 39.50889°N 98.43389°W / 39.50889; -98.43389
CountryUnited States
StateKansas
CountyMitchell
Government
 • MayorSteve Bader
Area
 • Total1.00 sq mi (2.59 km2)
 • Land1.00 sq mi (2.59 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
1,496 ft (456 m)
Population
 • Total469
 • Estimate 
(2016)[3]
451
 • Density470/sq mi (180/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
67430
Area code785
FIPS code20-11175 [4]
GNIS ID0472174 [5]
WebsiteCity Website

Cawker City is a city in Mitchell County, Kansas, United States. In 2010, 469 people lived there.[6] The city is along the north shore of Waconda Lake and Glen Elder State Park.

The largest ball of twine in the world is in Cawker City.[7][8][9]

History[change | change source]

Cawker City was created in 1870.[10] It was named after Colonel E. H. Cawker because he won a game of poker.[11] Cawker City was incorporated as a city in 1874.[12] The first post office in Cawker City was created in June 1870.[13]

Geography[change | change source]

Cawker City is at 39°30′32″N 98°26′2″W / 39.50889°N 98.43389°W / 39.50889; -98.43389 (39.508835, -98.433842).[14] The United States Census Bureau says that the city has a total area of 1.00 square mile (2.59 km2). All of it is land.[1] The city is along the north shore of Waconda Lake.

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,039
1890898−13.6%
1900816−9.1%
19108706.6%
1920788−9.4%
1930739−6.2%
1940657−11.1%
19506915.2%
1960686−0.7%
19707265.8%
1980640−11.8%
1990588−8.1%
2000521−11.4%
2010469−10.0%
Est. 2016451[3]−3.8%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[change | change source]

The 2010 census says that there were 469 people, 244 households, and 132 families living in Cawker City.[2]

Economy[change | change source]

In 2017, a Dollar General store was built. This gave residents a nearby shopping place for food.[15]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  4. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved October 10, 2011.
  7. Heim, Michael (2007). Exploring Kansas Highways. p. 78.
  8. Cawker City wins the ball game with massive sphere of twine; The Wichita Eagle; September 28, 2014.
  9. Twisted: The Battle to Be the World's Largest Ball of Twine; The Atlantic; September 9, 2014.
  10. Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 241.
  11. "Origin of Town Names" (PDF). Solomon Valley Highway 24 Heritage Alliance. p. 2. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  12. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 301.
  13. "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961 (archived)". Kansas Historical Society. Archived from the original on October 9, 2013. Retrieved 10 June 2014.
  14. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  15. Morris, Frank (December 11, 2017). "How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America". NPR.org. Retrieved 2017-12-12.

Other websites[change | change source]

City
Schools
Attractions
Pictures
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