Celtic punk

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Celtic punk
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins1980s London, England: Irish folk and punk rock scenes
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity1980s
Regional scenes
Other topics

Celtic punk is punk rock mixed with traditional Celtic music.

Celtic punk bands often play covers of traditional Irish, Welsh or Scottish folk and political songs. They will often make original songs too.[3] Common themes in Celtic punk music include politics, Celtic culture and identity, heritage, religion, drinking and working class pride.

The genre became popular in the 1980s by The Pogues. The Pogues are a band of London Irish punk musicians in London. They celebrated their Irish heritage.

The term Celtic punk is usually used to describe bands who base their music in Irish or Scottish traditional music. It is considered part of the more general folk punk genre. However, folk punk is usually used for bands that use English, American and other forms of folk music as inspiration.

The usual Celtic punk band includes a rock instrument as well as traditional instruments such as bagpipes, fiddle, tin whistle, accordion, mandolin, and banjo. Like Celtic rock, Celtic punk is a form of Celtic fusion.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. Ćunković, Milan. "Alfapop". Nadlanu (. Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  2. Tabak, Nate; Mullins, Lisa. "Belgrade's The Orthodox Celts Put Twist on Irish Standards". PRI. Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  3. P. Buckley, The Rough Guide to Rock (London: Rough Guides, 2003), p. 798.
  4. B. Sweers, Electric Folk: Changing Face of English Traditional Music (Oxford University Press, 2005), pp. 197-8.

Other websites[change | change source]