This article is about a World Heritage Site

Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art

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Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art
Logo Chateau de Montsoreau.png
Château de Montsoreau(Maine-et-Loire).jpg
Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art is located in France
Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art
Location within France
EstablishedJune 25, 2015; 6 years ago (2015-06-25)
LocationMontsoreau, France
Coordinates47°12′56″N 0°03′44″E / 47.2156°N 0.0622°E / 47.2156; 0.0622Coordinates: 47°12′56″N 0°03′44″E / 47.2156°N 0.0622°E / 47.2156; 0.0622
TypeContemporary art museum
CollectionsArt & Language
Collection size1,000
Visitors35,000 (2016)
50,000 (2018)
FounderPhilippe Méaille
Websitehttps://www.chateau-montsoreau.com/wordpress/fr/accueil/

The Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art, is a museum of contemporary art privately owned by the French art collector Philippe Méaille.[1][2][3][4] It is in the Loire Valley in France. The Château de Montsoreau-Museum of Contemporary Art is the only chateau of so called Chateaux of the Loire Valley to have been transformed in a museum of contemporary art.

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Collection[change | change source]

The Philippe Méaille collection is the collection of the museum. It is the world's largest collection of Art & Language works.[5] The collection is on the first two floors of the building. This collaboration between British, American, and Australian artists is at the origin of what is now called conceptual art.[6][7]

Gallery[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Largest collection of radical conceptualists Art & Language finds home in a French château". artnet.com. 2015.
  2. "A Historic Conceptual Art Group Has Taken Over a French Château". Hyperallergic. 14 October 2019. Retrieved 23 October 2019.
  3. "Combining Past, Present and Future: The Contemporary Art Museum at Château de Montsoreau".
  4. Chernick, Karen (20 September 2019). "The Collector Who Turned a 15th-Century French Castle into a Contemporary Art Destination". Artsy. Retrieved 23 October 2019.
  5. "Art & Language uncompleted: The Philippe Méaille Collection". macba.cat. 2014.
  6. "Art & Language". tate.org. 2008.
  7. "Collection Art & Language". artgallery.nsw.gov.au. 2000.

Other websites[change | change source]