Denmark-Norway

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Denmark–Norway

Danmark–Norge
1523–1533
1537–1814
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Coat of arms
Map of Denmark–Norway, c. 1780
Map of Denmark–Norway, c. 1780
StatusPersonal union (1523–1533)
Dualistic unitary state (1537–1814)
CapitalCopenhagen
and Oslo (Only in Norway 1523–1537)
Common languagesOfficial:
Danish, German, Renaissance Latin
Also spoken: Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Sami, Greenlandic
Religion
Lutheran
GovernmentElective monarchy 1523–1660 (Denmark)
Hereditary monarchy 1660–1814 (Denmark)
(Absolutism since 1660)
Elective monarchy 1523–1537 (Norway (de facto))
Hereditary monarchy 1537–1814 (Absolutism since 1661)
King 
• 1524–1533
Frederick I
• 1588–1648
Christian IV
• 1648–1670
Frederick III
• 1808–1814a
Frederick VI
Legislature
Historical eraEarly modern Europe
• Gustav Vasa elected
    King of Sweden

June 6, 1523
• Kalmar Union collapsed
1523
• Norwegian riksråd
    abolished

1537
• Danish rigsråd
    abolished

October 14, 1660
• Lex Regia confirms
    absolutism

November 14, 1665
• Treaty of Brömsebro
August 13, 1645
• Treaty of Roskilde
February 26, 1658
• Treaty of Kiel
January 14, 1814
• Congress of Vienna
September 1814 – June 1815
Area
1780b487,476 km2 (188,216 sq mi)
Population
• 1645c
1315000
• 1801d
1859000
Currency
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Kalmar Union
Denmark
Kingdom of Norway (1814)
Today part of
As territory

As colonies

The Kingdom of Denmark-Norway was a union between the two kingdoms Denmark and Norway, which lasted from 1536 to 1814.[2][3] During this time, the capital of both countries was Copenhagen, and they shared the same military. The kingdom also possessed colonies in Greenland, Iceland, Africa, the Caribbean and India.

Monarchs[change | change source]

  • 1524–1533: Frederick I
  • 1588–1648: Christian IV
  • 1648–1670: Frederick III
  • 1808–1814: Frederick VI

References[change | change source]

  1. regjeringen.no (5 July 2011). "A Forerunner to the Norwegian Council of State". Government.no.
  2. "Denmark". World Statesmen. Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  3. "Norway". World Statesmen. Retrieved 18 January 2015.