Dulce Amor Tour

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Dulce Amor Tour
Tour by Selena
Supporting album Dulce Amor
Start date November 26, 1988
End date July 26, 1989
Grossed $4,500
Shows 21
Selena tour chronology
Preciosa Tour (1987-88)
Dulce Amor Tour
Selena Tour
(1989-90)

The Dulce Amor Tour was the seventh small concert tour by American singer Selena. The tour was to promote her seventh independent LP record Dulce Amor (1988). The tour began on November 26, 1988, in Corpus Christi, Texas. The concert ended on July 26, 1989, in Houston, Texas. Selena had sung a lot of covers during this tour. She also had begun designing her own clothing.

Selena was inspired by Janet Jackson, Madonna and Paula Abdul for designing her own clothing. Selena was inspired by Michael Jackson for dance moves that she could perform. In some concerts, Selena was underpaid by venues across Texas. She was not paid fairly because she was a female lead-singer in a male-dominated genre. Selena had food thrown at her by Tejano fans at one of her concerts.

The concert tour had grossed only $4,500. The concert ended because of angry fans and because Selena was being promoted to EMI Latin.

About this tour[change | change source]

The Dulce Amor Tour started on November 26, 1988, in Corpus Christi, Texas, Selena's hometown.[1] The tour was also her last independent tour before signing a contract with EMI Latin.[2] Selena had asked her father, Abraham Quintanilla Jr, if she could design the band's clothing.[3] Her father did not want her to choose the band's clothing. However, he did give her permission to design her own clothing.[3]

Selena had inspiration from Madonna, Paula Abdul and Janet Jackson.[4] She also had inspiration for dance moves from Micheal Jackson and other popular 1980s singers.[4] When the tour had begun, Selena had performed more cover versions then her own songs.[4] Selena felt that she should sing popular music to help the band become more popular.[4] The concerts had usually lasted for an hour and a half.[4]

Selena was paid only $150 for each concert.[5] However, some venues underpaid Selena because she was a female lead-singer in a male-dominated genre.[5] Venues who booked Selena felt that she would never become a huge successful singer.[5] Some even laughed at Selena's father for even promoting her. During several concerts, food was thrown at Selena by Tejano fans.[5]

Selena was discriminated against and was not allowed to perform at some venues.[5] However, the Dulce Amor Tour became the most successful tour in Selena's early career.[5] This was because, more venues had booked Selena to perform and attendance to her concerts were growing.[5] The Dulce Amor Tour had grossed $4,500.[6]

In some concerts such as the December 10, 1988 Dallas, Texas concert, Selena had performed "Tú Solamente Tú", "Qué", "Soy Amiga", "Dame Tu Amor", "Dame Un Beso" and "A Million To One".[4] In this concert, she only had done two covers that night.[7]

On February 20, 1989, Selena performed in Odessa, Texas. Her concert had ended early because Tejano fans were throwing food at Selena.[5] Selena only got to perform "Costumbres", "Quisiera Darte", "I Like It", "No More Lies" and "Dulce Amor".[5] Selena and her band were taken back to their tour bus. The club owner did not pay Selena.[5] He felt that he now needed the money to clean up the mess.[5] He also banned Selena to ever perform again at his venue until 1994, after she had won a Grammy Award.[5]

Set list[change | change source]

Source:[5]

  1. "No More Lies" - cover by Michel'le
  2. "Costumbres"
  3. "Quisiera Darte"
  4. "I Like It" - cover by Dino
  5. "I Think We're Alone Now" - cover by Tiffany
  6. "Could've Been" - cover by Tiffany
  7. "Dulce Amor"
  8. "Cariño, Cariño Mio"
  9. "Thriller" - cover by Michael Jackson
  10. "Break" - Pete Astudillo sings in this period or Selena talks with the fans.
  11. "Open Your Heart" - cover by Madonna
  12. "Cien Anos"
  13. "La Bamba"
  14. "Anything for You" - cover by Whitney Houston
  15. "Always Mine"
  16. "No Llores Mas Corazon"

Concert Dates[change | change source]

Date City Venue
Tour Dates
November 26, 1988 Corpus Christi, Texas Unknown
November 30, 1988 San Antonio, Texas Unknown
December 10, 1988 Dallas, Texas Unknown
December 12, 1988 Mission, Texas Unknown
December 13, 1988 McAllen, Texas Unknown
December 15, 1988 Corpus Christi, Texas Unknown
January 6, 1989 Lubbock, Texas Unknown
January 11, 1989 Corpus Christi, Texas Unknown
January 20, 1989 Houston, Texas Unknown
February 3, 1989 Austin, Texas Escape Club
February 17, 1989 Houston, Texas Unknown
February 20, 1989 Odessa, Texas Unknown
March 27, 1989 San Antonio, Texas Unknown
April 2, 1989 Victoria, Texas Unknown
April 14, 1989 Dallas, Texas Unknown
April 16, 1989 Corpus Christi, Texas Unknown
May 23, 1989 Poteet, Texas Unknown
June 10, 1989 Eagle Pass, Texas Unknown
June 17, 1989 San Juan, Texas Unknown
July 20, 1989 Kingsville, Texas Unknown
July 26, 1989 Houston, Texas Unknown

Personnel[change | change source]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Patoski, p. 23
  2. Patoski, p. 26
  3. 3.0 3.1 Patoski, p. 30
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Paredez, p. 60
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 Paredez, p. 61
  6. Patoski, p. 12
  7. Paredez, p. 57
  8. Paredez, p. 70
  9. Paredez, p. 59

References[change | change source]

  • Patoski, Joe Nick (1996). Selena Como La Flor. Little Brown and Company. ISBN 0-3166-9378-2.
  • Richmond, Clint (1995). Selena: The Phenomenal Life and Tragic Death of the Tejano Music Queen/Selena!. Pocket Books. ISBN 0-6715-4522-1.
  • Wheeler, Jill C. (1996). Selena: The Queen of Tejano music. Abdo Group. ISBN 1-5623-9523-8.
  • Arraras, Maria Celeste (1997). El Secreto De Selena : LA Reveladora Historia Detras De Su Tragica Muerte / The Secret Of Selena: LA Reveladora Historia Detras De Su Tragica Muerte. Fireside. ISBN 0-6848-3135-X.
  • Geraldo, Ruiz (1995). Selena: The Last Song. Warner Pub Service. ISBN 1-8875-9901-0.
  • Castrejon, Cristina (2010). Selena: Su Vida Despues de su Muerte. Punto de Lectura. ISBN 978-6-0711-0416-8.
  • Paredez, Deborah (12 August 2009). Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. Duke University Press Books. ISBN 978-0-8223-45022.

Other websites[change | change source]