Ecnomiohyla miliaria

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Ecnomiohyla miliaria
Ecnomiohyla miliaria.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Hylidae
Genus: Ecnomiohyla
Species:
E. miliaria
Binomial name
Ecnomiohyla miliaria
(Cope, 1886)
Synonyms[2]
  • Hypsiboas miliarius (Cope, 1886)
  • Hyla miliaria (Günther, 1901)
  • Plectrohyla miliaria (Taylor and Smith, 1945)
  • Hyla immensa (Taylor, 1952)
  • Ecnomiohyla miliaria (Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005)

Cope's brown tree frog (Ecnomiohyla miliaria) is a frog that lives in Honduras, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. Scientists also saw it in Colombia. Scientists have seen it as high as 1300 meters above sea level.[2][3]

The adult male frog can be 57.2 to 106.0 mm long from nose to rear end. Scientists caught one adult female frog. She was 69.7 mm long. It is a mixture of brown, green, and orange in color.[3]

Scientists do not know much about what this frog does. But they can guess by looking at the frog's body. Scientists believe this frog lives in trees because it has disks on its toes just like the ones that other tree frogs use to climb. They also believe this frog lives in trees because it has fringes of skin just like the ones other tree frogs use to glide in the air.[3] Some scientists have seen this frog gliding.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group (2020). "Cope's Brown Treefrog: Ecnomiohyla miliaria". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T55561A54346862. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T55561A54346862.en. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Ecnomiohyla miliaria (Cope, 1886)". Amphibian Species of the World 6.0, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Sean Schoville; Michelle S. Koo (February 27, 2000). "Ecnomiohyla miliaria: Cope's Brown Treefrog". Amphibiaweb. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  4. Sean Schoville; Michelle S. Koo (February 21, 2000). "Ecnomiohyla fimbrimembra: Fringe-limbed Treefrog". Amphibiaweb. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved January 13, 2022.