Elk County, Kansas

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Elk County
Pratt Truss Bridge near Elk Falls
Map of Kansas highlighting Elk County
Location within the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: Coordinates: 37°27′N 96°14′W / 37.450°N 96.233°W / 37.450; -96.233
Country United States
State Kansas
FoundedMarch 25, 1875
Named forElk River
SeatHoward
Largest cityHoward
Area
 • Total650 sq mi (1,700 km2)
 • Land644 sq mi (1,670 km2)
 • Water6.2 sq mi (16 km2)  1.0%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2016)
2,547
 • Density4.5/sq mi (1.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Area code620
Congressional district4th
Websiteelkcountyks.org

Elk County (county code EK) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 2,882 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Howard. Howard is also the biggest city in Elk County.[2]

History[change | change source]

19th century[change | change source]

In 1875, Elk County was created. It was named after the Elk River.[3]

The first railroad in Elk County was built through that territory in 1879.[4] It connected ranches and farms to markets.

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has a total area of 650 square miles (1,700 km2). Of that, 644 square miles (1,670 km2) is land and 6.2 square miles (16 km2) (1.0%) is water.[5]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188010,623
189012,21615.0%
190011,443−6.3%
191010,128−11.5%
19209,034−10.8%
19309,2101.9%
19408,180−11.2%
19506,679−18.3%
19605,048−24.4%
19703,858−23.6%
19803,9181.6%
19903,327−15.1%
20003,261−2.0%
20102,882−11.6%
Est. 20162,547[6]−11.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2016[1]

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 83.2% 1,048 12.7% 160 4.1% 51
2012 76.6% 1,049 20.5% 281 2.9% 39
2008 72.7% 1,042 25.3% 363 2.0% 29
2004 73.9% 1,119 24.4% 369 1.8% 27
2000 69.7% 1,080 25.9% 402 4.4% 68
1996 56.8% 933 29.7% 488 13.5% 222
1992 42.9% 748 27.8% 485 29.2% 509
1988 63.0% 1,075 35.6% 608 1.4% 23
1984 72.9% 1,301 25.3% 452 1.8% 32
1980 69.7% 1,280 26.2% 482 4.1% 75
1976 54.8% 1,087 43.6% 865 1.5% 30
1972 76.0% 1,522 21.4% 428 2.6% 52
1968 64.6% 1,327 24.5% 503 10.9% 223
1964 55.7% 1,267 43.7% 994 0.5% 12
1960 68.5% 1,830 30.8% 823 0.8% 20
1956 69.9% 1,909 29.7% 812 0.4% 10
1952 76.4% 2,380 23.0% 717 0.6% 19
1948 63.8% 1,962 35.4% 1,087 0.9% 26
1944 70.3% 2,283 29.4% 954 0.3% 9
1940 64.8% 2,774 34.5% 1,478 0.7% 31
1936 53.2% 2,355 46.6% 2,059 0.2% 9
1932 43.0% 1,746 55.2% 2,239 1.8% 72
1928 77.5% 3,007 21.4% 831 1.1% 42
1924 64.3% 2,443 29.0% 1,104 6.7% 255
1920 65.3% 2,253 32.2% 1,110 2.6% 89
1916 43.9% 1,769 51.0% 2,053 5.1% 204
1912 24.1% 605 38.7% 971 37.2% 935
1908 54.1% 1,454 44.2% 1,187 1.7% 46
1904 67.5% 1,713 27.8% 706 4.7% 120
1900 55.2% 1,632 44.4% 1,311 0.4% 13
1896 47.6% 1,339 52.0% 1,464 0.4% 12
1892 47.2% 1,235 52.8% 1,382
1888 53.7% 1,566 23.9% 696 22.4% 654

Laws[change | change source]

The Kansas Constitution was changed in 1986 to allow the sale of alcohol, but Elk County voters have chosen to remain a "dry" county.[12]

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Elk County (map legend)

Cities[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. "Elk County, Kansas". Kansas Historical Society. Retrieved 20 March 2014.
  4. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. pp. 573–574.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  11. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  12. "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2004. Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-01-21. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)

More reading[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]

County
Maps