FESTAC 77

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Festac '77, was a major international festival held in Lagos, Nigeria, from 15 January 1977 to 12 February 1977.[1] The event celebrated African culture and showcased to the world African music, fine art, literature, drama, dance and religion. About 16,000 participants performed at the event.[2][3] Artists who performed at the festival included Stevie Wonder from United States, Gilberto Gil from Brazil, Bembeya Jazz National from Guinea, Mighty Sparrow from Trinidad and Tobago, Les Ballets Africains, South African Miriam Makeba, and Franco Luambo Makiadi. At the time it was held, it was the largest gathering of African people to ever take.[4]

The official symbol of the festival was a similar symbol crafted by Erhabor Emokpae of the royal ivory mask of Benin.[5] The hosting of the festival led to the creation of the Nigerian National Council of Arts and Culture, Festac Village and the National Theatre, Iganmu, Lagos.[6] Most of the events were held in four main venues: the National Theatre, National Stadium, Surulere, Lagos City Hall and Tafawa Balewa Square.[7]

References[change | change source]

  1. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1977/02/14/festac-upbeat-finale/e97a144d-bd6a-4e03-ba18-e0be4217d057/
  2. Company, Johnson Publishing (May 1977). Ebony Jr. Johnson Publishing Company.
  3. Falola, Toyin (2002). Key Events in African History: A Reference Guide. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-313-31323-3.
  4. Shujaa, Mwalimu J.; Shujaa, Kenya J. (2015-07-13). The SAGE Encyclopedia of African Cultural Heritage in North America. SAGE Publications. ISBN 978-1-4833-4638-0.
  5. Falola, Toyin (2009). Historical dictionary of Nigeria. Internet Archive. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-5615-8.
  6. Apter, Andrew (2005). The Pan-African Nation: Oil and the Spectacle of Culture in Nigeria. University of Chicago Press.
  7. Foundation for Research in the Afro-American Creative Arts, "Festac '77", The Black Perspective in Music, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Spring 1977), pp. 104–117.