Falcon 9

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Falcon 9
Falcon 9 logo by SpaceX.png
Bangabandhu Satellite-1 Mission (42025499722).jpg
SpaceX's Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket lifts off from Kennedy Space Center LC-39A with the Bangabandhu-1 satellite (15 May 2018).
FunctionOrbital launch vehicle
ManufacturerSpaceX
Country of originUnited States
Cost per launch
  • New: $62M (2016),
  • Flight Proven: $50M (2018), [1]
Size
Height
  • FT: 70 m (230 ft)
  • v1.1: 68.4 metres (224 feet)
  • v1.0: 54.9 metres (180 feet)
Diameter3.7 metres (12 feet)
Mass
  • FT: 549,054 kilograms (1,210,457 pounds)
  • v1.1: 505,846 kilograms (1,115,200 pounds)
  • v1.0: 333,400 kilograms (735,000 pounds)
Stages2
Capacity
Payload to LEO (28.5°)
  • FT: 22,800 kilograms (50,300 pounds) expended
  • v1.1: 13,150 kilograms (28,990 pounds)
  • v1.0: 10,450 kilograms (23,040 pounds)
Payload to GTO (27°)
  • FT: 8,300 kilograms (18,300 pounds) expended,
    5,500 kg (12,100 lb) when landing.
  • v1.1: 4,850 kilograms (10,690 pounds)
  • v1.0: 4,540 kilograms (10,010 pounds)
Payload to MarsFT: 4,020 kilograms (8,860 pounds)
Associated rockets
DerivativesFalcon Heavy
Launch history
Status
  • FT Block 5: Active[2]
  • FT Block 4: Retired
  • FT Block 3: Retired
  • v1.1: Retired
  • v1.0: Retired
Launch sites
Total launches
  • 70
    • FT: 51
    • v1.1: 15
    • v1.0: 5
Successes
  • 68
    • FT: 51
    • v1.1: 14
    • v1.0: 4

Falcon 9 is a family of launch vehicles that are built by SpaceX. It is named for its use of nine rocket engines. It is powered by liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket grade kerosene (RP-1). The current version can launch payloads of up to 22,800 kilograms (50,300 pounds) to Low Earth orbit. It can launch up to 8,300 kilograms (18,300 pounds) to Geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). In theory, it can also launch 4,020 kilograms (8,860 pounds) to Mars.[3]

NASA gave SpaceX a Commercial Resupply Services contract to launch Falcon 9s with Dragon capsules to the ISS.[4] Now SpaceX is trying to human-rate the Falcon 9 so that SpaceX can launch crews to the ISS in this year. The first version of the Falcon 9 flew in 4 June 2010. The latest version, Block 5, was introduced in 15 May 2018 with increased engine power and other changes to help recovery and reuse.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Musk: 100 Launches Per Falcon 9 Block 5 Booster is Possible". Parabolic Arc. Archived from the original on July 19, 2018. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  2. Seemangal, Robin (May 4, 2018). "SpaceX Test-Fires New Falcon 9 Block 5 Rocket Ahead of Maiden Flight (Updated)". Popular Mechanics. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  3. "Falcon 9 | SpaceX". Retrieved 2019-05-15.
  4. Amos, Jonathan (8 October 2012). "SpaceX lifts off with ISS cargo". BBC News. Retrieved 3 June 2018.