Finney County, Kansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Finney County, Kansas
County
Finney County, Kansas courthouse from NE 1.JPG
Finney County Courthouse in Garden City
Location within Kansas
Location within Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 22, 1883
Named forDavid W. Finney
SeatGarden City
Largest cityGarden City
Area
 • Total1,303 sq mi (3,375 km2)
 • Land1,302 sq mi (3,372 km2)
 • Water0.7 sq mi (2 km2), 0.05%
Population (est.)
 • (2016)36,722
 • Density28/sq mi (11/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
WebsiteFinneyCounty.org

Finney County (county code FI) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 36,776 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Garden City. Its biggest city is also Garden City.[2]

Finney County Historical Museum in Garden City is located in Finnup Park.

History[change | change source]

Finney County was created around 1880. It was called Buffalo County and Sequoyah County. They were named after Sequoyah, the Cherokee Indian responsible for the creation of the Cherokee alphabet. The two counties were renamed Finney County. It was named after Lieutenant Governor David Wesley Finney.[3]

Charles "Buffalo" Jones was the first member of the Kansas House of Representatives from Finney County. He tried to stop the buffalo from extinction.[4]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has a total area of 1,303 square miles (3,370 km2). Of that, 1,302 square miles (3,370 km2) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) (0.05%) is water.[5] It is the second-largest county in Kansas by area.

Demographics[change | change source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
18904,231
19003,469−18.0%
19106,90899.1%
19207,67411.1%
193011,01443.5%
194010,092−8.4%
195015,09249.5%
196016,0936.6%
197018,94717.7%
198023,82525.7%
199033,07038.8%
200040,52322.5%
201036,776−9.2%
Est. 201636,722[6]−9.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2016[1]

Finney County is included in the Garden City, KS Micropolitan Statistical Area.

2010 Census[change | change source]

The 2010 census[11] says that there were 36,776 people, 12,359 households and 8,903 families living in Finney County.

Government[change | change source]

Presidential election results[change | change source]

Finney County has often supported Republican presidential candidates. The last time it supported a Democrat was in 1976. This was when Jimmy Carter won the county by only 102 votes.

Presidential election results
Presidential election results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 62.5% 6,350 31.5% 3,195 6.0% 614
2012 68.5% 6,219 29.5% 2,682 2.0% 183
2008 66.9% 6,926 31.6% 3,275 1.5% 153
2004 75.3% 7,479 23.7% 2,351 1.0% 103
2000 70.4% 6,442 26.6% 2,431 3.0% 277
1996 65.4% 6,188 25.6% 2,420 9.0% 849
1992 48.3% 5,278 23.9% 2,612 27.8% 3,043
1988 60.1% 5,381 38.1% 3,408 1.8% 158
1984 73.1% 6,938 25.9% 2,458 1.0% 98
1980 58.6% 4,831 32.6% 2,689 8.8% 726
1976 48.4% 3,711 49.7% 3,813 1.9% 143
1972 65.7% 4,335 31.2% 2,062 3.1% 205
1968 52.1% 3,295 39.9% 2,521 8.0% 507
1964 37.4% 2,201 61.9% 3,639 0.7% 43
1960 59.6% 3,720 39.9% 2,490 0.5% 30
1956 66.9% 3,576 32.8% 1,752 0.4% 20
1952 72.3% 4,290 26.9% 1,597 0.8% 45
1948 50.0% 2,508 47.2% 2,367 2.8% 140
1944 58.2% 2,366 41.0% 1,667 0.8% 32
1940 53.4% 2,349 46.1% 2,027 0.6% 24
1936 40.9% 1,863 58.8% 2,682 0.3% 13
1932 47.0% 2,116 51.1% 2,300 1.9% 84
1928 76.7% 2,433 22.3% 709 1.0% 32
1924 61.7% 1,753 21.6% 614 16.7% 476
1920 69.0% 1,573 27.1% 619 3.9% 89
1916 42.8% 1,238 47.3% 1,370 10.0% 288
1912 18.0% 283 36.4% 573 45.7% 719[a]
1908 61.5% 1,000 33.9% 551 4.7% 76
1904 66.8% 598 24.0% 215 9.2% 82
1900 59.9% 525 38.3% 336 1.8% 16
1896 57.9% 505 41.9% 366 0.2% 2
1892 58.3% 478 41.7% 342
1888 63.0% 694 31.6% 348 5.5% 60

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Finney County (map legend)

Cities[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 126.
  4. "Buffalo Jones". h-net.msu.edu. Retrieved September 4, 2010.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  11. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
Notes
  1. This total comprises 586 votes (37.2 percent) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who carried the county) and 133 votes (8.4 percent) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

More reading[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]

County
Other
Maps

Coordinates: 38°01′N 100°40′W / 38.017°N 100.667°W / 38.017; -100.667