First Chechen War

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First Chechen War
Part of the Chechen-Russian conflict and the post-Soviet conflicts
Evstafiev-helicopter-shot-down.jpg
A Russian Mil Mi-8 helicopter brought down by Chechen fighters near the capital Grozny in 1994.
Date11 December 1994 - 31 August 1996
Location
Result Chechen victory
Belligerents
Chechen Republic of Ichkeria
Foreign volunteers
Russia
Chechen opposition
Units involved
Armed Forces of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria
Chechen Mujahideen
Georgian volunteers
Ukrainian National Assembly – Ukrainian People's Self-Defence
Russian Armed Forces
Loyalist opposition
Casualties and losses
3,654–17,391 killed or missing Disputed

The First Chechen War was a war between the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria and Russia from 1994 to 1996.

Battles[change | change source]

The war was caused by Russia's prior attempt to overthrow the Chechen government in the Battle of Grozny in November of 1994. The initial campaign of the war saw the deadly First Battle of Grozny. Russia's major military failures during the conflict led to a rise of opposition movements against Russian president Boris Yeltsin.

Damages[change | change source]

Death estimates for the Russian military in the conflict range anywhere from 3,500 up to 14,000.[1] The war caused massive devastation for the region of Chechnya and neighboring areas of Russia that continues until this day.[2] The conflict also caused a rise of ethnic tensions between Chechens and non-Chechens in Chechnya.[3]

Aftermath[change | change source]

In the aftermath of the First Chechen War, a rise of radical Islamic thought in the form of Jihadism began to rise in Chechnya. This ultimately led to the Chechen Civil War[4] and later the pretext for the Second Chechen War.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Casualty Figures". Archived from the original on 2009-09-04. Retrieved 2022-04-05.
  2. Higgins, Andrew (2019-12-10). "The War That Continues to Shape Russia, 25 Years Later". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-04-05.
  3. "РОССИЯ-ЧЕЧНЯ: цепь ошибок и преступлений". web.archive.org. 2017-02-09. Retrieved 2022-04-05.
  4. Hellesøy, Kjersti (2013). "Civil War and the Radicalization of Islam in Chechnya". Journal of Religion and Violence. 1 (1): 21–37. ISSN 2159-6808.