French Americans

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French Americans
Franco-Américains
Drapeau Franco-Américain.svg
Total population
10,329,465[1]
~3% of the U.S. population (2013)
8,228,623 (only French)
2,100,842 (French Canadian)
Regions with significant populations
Predominantly in New England, Arkansas and Louisiana with smaller communities in New York, the Midwest, Tennessee, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, California, Florida and North Carolina
Languages
English (American English dialects)
French (CajunAcadianCanadian FrenchHaitian FrenchMissouriNew England French)
Religion
Predominantly Roman Catholic, minority Protestant
Related ethnic groups
French, French Canadians, French Canadian Americans, Québécois, Cajuns, Acadians, French Haitians

French Americans (French: Américain français), also called Franco-Americans (French: Franco-Américain) are Americans who identify themselves to be of French or French Canadian descent. About 11.8 million U.S. residents are of French or French Canadian descent. About 2 million speak French at home.[2] An additional 750,000 U.S. residents speak a French-based creole language, according to the 2011 census.[3]

Americans of French descent make up a substantial percentage of the American population. However French Americans are less visible than other similarly sized ethnic groups. This is due in part to the high degree of assimilation among Huguenot (French Protestant) settlers. Also, there is a tendency of French American groups to identify more strongly with "New World" regional identities. These include Québécois, French Canadian, Acadian, Cajun, or Louisiana Creole. This has prevented the development of a wider French American identity.

References[change | change source]

  1. "2013 ACS Ancestry estimates". Factfinder2.census.gov. 2013. Retrieved 2015-10-15.
  2. Hyon B. Shin; Rosalind Bruno (22 October 2015). "Language Use and English-speaking Ability: 2000" (PDF). 2000 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. Camille Ryan (2013). "Language Use in the United States: 2011 - American Community Survey Reports" (PDF). U.S. Census. p. 3. Retrieved 22 October 2015.

Other websites[change | change source]