Galactose

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D-Galactose
Beta-D-Galactopyranose.svg
DGalactose Fischer.svg
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.379
KEGG
MeSH {{{value}}}
PubChem {{{value}}}
UNII
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C6H12O6
Molar mass 180.16 g·mol−1
Appearance White solid[1]
Odor Odorless[1]
Density 1.5 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 168–170 °C (334–338 °F; 441–443 K)[1]
650 g/L (20 °C)[1]
-103.00·10−6 cm3/mol
Pharmacology
V04CE01 (WHO) V08DA02 (WHO) (microparticles)
Hazards
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

0
1
0
 
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Galactose (from the Greek stem γάλακτ– galakt–, "milk") is a sugar. It has almost the same chemical structure as glucose. Large amounts of pure galactose do not exist in nature. Instead, galactose is usually found with glucose in lactose, a sugar found in milk and other milk products. After lactose is digested and absorbed, galactose arrives in the liver. There it is changed into either glucose or glycogen.


References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Record in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health