Galileo (spacecraft)

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Galileo
Artwork Galileo-Io-Jupiter.JPG
Artist's concept of Galileo at Io; the high-gain antenna is fully deployed
Names Jupiter Orbiter Probe
Mission type Jupiter orbiter
Operator NASA
COSPAR ID 1989-084B
SATCAT no. 20298
Website solarsystem.nasa.gov/galileo/
Mission duration
  • Planned: 8 years, 1 month, 19 days
  • In orbit: 7 years, 9 months, 13 days
  • Final: 13 years, 11 months, 3 days
Distance travelled 4,631,778,000 km (2.88 billion mi)[1]
Spacecraft properties
Manufacturer
Launch mass
  • Total: 2,562 kg (5,648 lb)[2]
  • Orbiter: 2,223 kg (4,901 lb)[2]
  • Probe: 339 kg (747 lb)[2]
Dry mass
  • Orbiter: 1,884 kg (4,154 lb)[2]
  • Probe: 339 kg (747 lb)[2]
Payload mass
  • Orbiter: 118 kg (260 lb)[2]
  • Probe: 30 kg (66 lb)[2]
Power
  • Orbiter: 570 watts[2]
  • Probe: 730 watt-hours[2]
Start of mission
Launch date October 18, 1989, 16:53:40 (1989-10-18UTC16:53:40) UTC[4]
Rocket Template:OV
STS-34 / IUS
Launch site Kennedy LC-39B
Entered service December 8, 1995, 01:16 UTC SCET[3]
End of mission
Disposal Deorbited
Decay date September 21, 2003, 18:57:18 (2003-09-21UTC18:57:19) UTC SCET[1]
Jupiter orbiter
Spacecraft component Orbiter
Orbital insertion December 8, 1995, 01:16 UTC SCET[3]
Jupiter atmospheric probe
Spacecraft component Probe
Atmospheric entry December 7, 1995, 22:04 UTC SCET[3]
Impact site 06°05′N 04°04′W / 6.083°N 4.067°W / 6.083; -4.067 (Galileo Probe)
at entry interface

Galileo mission patch.png

Galileo was an unmanned NASA spacecraft. It explored the planet Jupiter and its moons. Galileo was launched in 1989 and it arrived at Jupiter in 1995.

Galileo was made up of two parts: an orbiter and a probe. The probe was released from the orbiter on July 13, 1995 and it went towards Jupiter.[5][6] It reached Jupiter on December 7, 1995 and went down into the atmosphere.[5][6] The probe gathered data for 57 minutes until the great atmospheric heat and pressure destroyed it.[5][6]

The orbiter went into orbit around the planet on December 8, 1995[5] and went down into Jupiter's atmosphere and was crushed on September 21, 2003.[7]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "The Final Day on Galileo - Sunday, September 21, 2003". NASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory via Spaceref.com. September 19, 2003. Retrieved December 18, 2016. 
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 "Galileo Jupiter Arrival" (PDF) (Press Kit). NASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory. December 1995. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 D'Amario, Louis A.; Bright, Larry E.; Wolf, Aron A. (May 1992). "Galileo Trajectory Design". Space Science Reviews 60 (1-4): 23–78. doi:10.1007/BF00216849. 
  4. Beyer, P. E.; O'Connor, R. C.; Mudgway, D. J. (May 15, 1992). "Galileo Early Cruise, Including Venus, First Earth, and Gaspra Encounters". The Telecommunications and Data Acquisition Report (NASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory): 265–281. TDA Progress Report 42-109. http://ipnpr.jpl.nasa.gov/progress_report/42-109/109T.PDF. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 "NASA: Solar System Exploration: Missions: By Target: Jupiter: Past: Galileo". NASA. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "Galileo" (CD). Encyclopædia Britannica Deluxe Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica. 2005. 
  7. "NASA: Solar System Exploration: Galileo Legacy Site". NASA. Retrieved 2011-03-29.