Game pie

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Game pie
Adriaen van Utrecht - Still Life with Games and Vegetables - Google Art Project.jpg
A painting showing some of the types of game used in cooking
TypeMeat pie
Place of originRoman Empire
Main ingredientsGame

Game pie is a kind of meat pie made with game. It has been made since Roman times.

Its main ingredients, then and now, are wild birds and animals such as partridge, pheasant, deer and hare. The pies became very elaborate during the 18th century in England. They developed complex recipes and special moulds and serving dishes. The versions cooked today are more simple, but they still include rabbit, venison, pigeon, pheasant, and other game meats.[1]

The Oreiller de la Belle Aurore is an elaborate game pie named after Claudine-Aurore Récamier, the mother of Brillat-Savarin. The large square pie, which was one of her son's favorite meals, contains a variety of game birds and their livers, veal, pork, truffles, aspic, and more, in puff pastry. It is described in the classic encyclopedia of gastronomy, the Larousse Gastronomique.[2] It is one of three pies named after people from Brillat-Savarin's home town of Belley (later called Bugey). They were described by Lucien Tenret.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. Mark Hix Game pie; Serves 4–6 26 November 2005 Independent
  2. Prosper Montagne (1961). Charlotte Turgeon and Nina Froud (ed.). Larousse Gastronomique: The Encyclopedia of Food, Wine, and Cookery (English translation of the 1938 edition). New York: Crown Publishers. ISBN 0-517-50333-6.
  3. La Table au pays de Brillat-Savarin. The others were ‘’chapeau de Monseigneur Cortois de Quinsey’’ and ‘’toque du Président Adolphe Clerc’’