Gheba tribe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Gheba tribe are a tribe from the Punjab, mostly located in the Fateh Jang Tehsil of Attock District of Pakistan. They are generally classified as Rajputs.[1] But some of them claim that they are Barlas Mughals in Census Report 1901[2]

Origins[change | change source]

The origins of the Ghebas is subject to some dispute or controversy for quite some time;[3] according to most scholars, historians and early British Indian administrators of their native areas, the Ghebas, like their close kin the Jodhra tribe and Alpial, are of Hindu origins, probably Rajputs.[4] They were at one time spread out over a broader area, in both Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa areas of what is now Pakistan but over time, their main population came to live in Attock and Rawalpindi districts of northern Punjab. They were most probably descended from one Raja Dayanand, a Chauhan Rajput, through Rai Shankar, whose offspring 'Rai Gheba' converted to Islam and was given the title of 'Gheba Khan'.[5] They have been Muslims since then and sizable landowners in the districts they live in.[6]

There is another view, often believed by some Gheba families, that they are not really Rajputs or Jatts but are Barlas Mughals,[7] although this view is not historically substantiated.

Villages[change | change source]

Whatever their origins, the Ghebas continue to be among the biggest landowners of northern Punjab, in present-day Pakistan. Their biggest and most important village in Attock area is Kot Fateh Khan, which is part of the Jagir estate of the Sardar of Kot,[8]

Occupations[change | change source]

Most of the Ghebas are landowners and engaged in agricultural activities.[9]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Gazetteer of the Rawalpindi District, 1893-1894, pp.107-108
  2. "Gazetteer of the Attock District, 1930, Part 1" Author Punjab (Pakistan) Edition 2, reprint Publisher Sang-e-Meel Publications, 1932 Original from the University of Michigan Digitized Aug 29, 2008 Length 326 pages Subjects History
  3. See Griffin and Massey, Chiefs and Families of Note in the Punjab Lahore, 1899, along with detailed appendices of pedigree tables
  4. Griffin and Massey
  5. CH Hall and RT Burney, The Earliest History and Pedigrees of the Gheba and Jodhra Chiefs of Attock Monograph, Government of India Press, Calcutta, 1867
  6. Hall and Burney
  7. "Gazetteer of the Attock District, 1930, Part 1" (Punjab district gazetteers) Author Punjab (Pakistan) Edition 2, reprint Publisher Sang-e-Meel Publications, 1932 Original from the University of Michigan Digitized Aug 29, 2008 Length 326 pages Subjects Histoy
  8. Attock Gazetteer 1907 page 94
  9. "Gazetteer of the Attock District, 1907", Author Punjab (Pakistan) Edition 2, reprint Publisher Sang-e-Meel Publications. Original from the University of Michigan Subjects Histoy