Gluten-free diet

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A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes foods containing gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and possibly oats. Most breads, cakes, pastas/noodles, beers and pizzas are made with gluten. Gluten is used as a food additive in the form of a flavoring, stabilizing or thickening agent. It is often called "dextrin". Some non-foods, such as medications and vitamin supplements, especially those in tablet form, may contain gluten as a binding agent.[1][2]

A gluten-free diet is the only medically accepted treatment for wheat allergy and coeliac disease (in North America, it is usually spelled "celiac disease").

Some gluten-free diets also exclude oats. Doctors do not agree on whether oats affect coeliac disease sufferers.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9] Many alcoholic beverages are gluten free. Majority types of whiskey and beer contain gluten as using grains is necessary part of production.[10] Gluten-free diets have become popular worldwide. Some say that such a diet can cause problems with Vitamin B and Magnesium intake by body (wheat improves the rate in which humans body can use them).[11] Gluten foods sometimes is used as bi-product of colorants, conservants and thickeners in products such as ice-cream and ketchup. Even some cosmetics like lip-balm and lipsticks can use gluten foods - so person wanting to follow such a diet need to learn about which products contain wheat's.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Frequently Asked Questions". IPC Americas Inc. 2008-02-27. Archived from the original on 2008-04-11. http://web.archive.org/web/20080411172805/http://www.ipecamericas.org/public/faqs.html#question4. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  2. "Excipient Ingredients in Medications". Gluten Free Drugs. November 3, 2007. http://www.glutenfreedrugs.com/Excipients.htm. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  3. N Y Haboubi, S Taylor, S Jones (2006). "Celiac disease and oats: a systematic review". The Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. http://pmj.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/82/972/672.
  4. "The Gluten-Free Diet" – CeliacSociety.com
  5. Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Burkhard Fleckenstein; Øyvind Molberg; Helge Scott; Frits Koning; Günther Jung; Peter Roepstorff; Knut E. A. Lundin; Ludvig M. Sollid (2004-10-19). "The Molecular Basis for Oat Intolerance in Patients with Coeliac Disease". PLoS Medicine (PLoS Medicine) 1 (1): e1. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0010001 . PMC 523824 . PMID 15526039 . http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pmed.0010001. Retrieved 2006-07-22.
  6. Størsrud, S; M Olsson; R Avidsson Lenner; L Å Nilsson; O Nilsson; A Kilander (2002-05-07). "Adult celiac patients do tolerate large amounts of oats". European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 57 (1). doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601525 . PMID 12548312 . http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v57/n1/full/1601525a.html. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
  7. Janatuinen, E K; T A Kemppainen; R J K Julkunen; V-M Kosma; M Mäki; M Heikkinen; M I J Uusitupa (2002-05-01). "No harm from five year ingestion of oats in celiac disease". GUT Journal Online. http://gut.bmj.com/cgi/gca?allch=&SEARCHID=1&VOLUME=50&FIRSTPAGE=332&FIRSTINDEX=0&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=1&gca=gutjnl%3B50%2F3%2F332. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
  8. "The Scoop on Oats". Celiac Sprue Association (CSA). February 20, 2008. http://www.csaceliacs.org/InfoonOats.php.
  9. Mohsid, Rashid (2007-06-08). "Guidelines for Consumption of Pure and Uncontaminated Oats by Individuals with Coeliac Disease". Professional Advisory Board of Canadian Coeliac Association. http://www.celiac.ca/Articles/PABoatsguidelines2007June.html. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
  10. http://web.archive.org/web/20060513235929/http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=413
  11. http://www.glutenfreedietfoods.com/

Other websites[change | change source]

  • The great gluten-free diet fad. 2015. BBC News Magazine. [1]