Gothic rock

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Gothic rock
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins Late 1970s, United Kingdom
Typical instruments
Derivative forms
Subgenres
Fusion genres
Other topics

Gothic rock (also referred to as goth rock or simply goth) is a style of rock music that came from post-punk in the late 1970s. The first post-punk bands which shifted towards dark music with gothic overtones include Siouxsie and the Banshees,[4][5] Joy Division,[4][5][6] Bauhaus[4][5] and the Cure.[4][5]

The genre itself was defined as different from post-punk due to its darker music and romantic lyrics.

References[change | change source]

  1. Anon (n.d.). "Dream Pop". AllMusic. 
  2. "Darkwave". AllMusic. 
  3. "Goth metal". Allmusic. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Abebe, Nitsuh (24 January 2007). "Various Artists: A Life Less Lived: The Gothic Box". Pitchfork. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 "NME Originals: Goth". NME. 2004. Archived from the original on January 26, 2008. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  6. Rambali, Paul (July 1983). "A Rare Glimpse into a Private World". The Face. "Curtis' death wrapped an already mysterious group in legend. From the press eulogies, you would think Curtis had gone to join Chatterton, Rimbaud and Morrison in the hallowed hall of premature harvests. To a group with several strong gothic characteristics was added a further piece of romance. The rock press had lost its great white hope, but they had lost a friend. It must have made bitter reading.".