Harashim

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Harashim
חֲרָשִׁים (Hebrew)
זריחה 19-1-2013 1.JPG
Harashim is located in Northwest Israel
Harashim
Harashim
Coordinates: 32°57′23″N 35°19′42″E / 32.95639°N 35.32833°E / 32.95639; 35.32833Coordinates: 32°57′23″N 35°19′42″E / 32.95639°N 35.32833°E / 32.95639; 35.32833
Country Israel
DistrictNorthern District
Regional CouncilMisgav Regional Council
Population315

Harashim (Hebrew: חֲרָשִׁים, lit. Craftsmen) is a village in northern Israel.

Location[change | change source]

This place is located in the Upper Galilee region to the north of Karmiel. It falls under the jurisdiction of Misgav Regional Council in the Northern District. In 2017 it had a population of 315.[1] Its elevation is 830 m (2,723.10 ft).[2] Harashim is the wettest settlement in Israel.[3]

History[change | change source]

The village was established in 1980. It was made as part of the Galilee plan to encourage Jewish settlement in the region. Its name comes from nearby Tel Harashim, an Iron Age Jewish village where it is believed the inhabitants worked as blacksmiths.[4]

Climate[change | change source]

Harashim has a Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification: Csa) with hot, dry summers and cool, rainy and occasionally snowy winters. The village receives 956 mm (38 in) of precipitation per year. Summers are rainless and hot with an average high temperature of 29 °C (84 °F) and an average low temperature of 18 °C (64 °F). Winters are cool and wet, and precipitation is occasionally in the form of snow. Winters have an average high temperature of 12 °C (54 °F) and an average low temperature of 5 °C (41 °F). Harashim is the wettest inhabited place in Israel.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "List of localities, in Alphabetical order" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved August 26, 2018.
  2. "Harashim". Israel Meteorological Service. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 David Ratner (6 January 2005). "The Wettest Place in Israel". Haaretz. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  4. Jonathan L. Reed (2000). Archaeology and the Galilean Jesus: A Re-examination of the Evidence. Trinity Press International. ISBN 9781563383946. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  5. "Temperature average" (in Hebrew). Israel Meteorological Service. Retrieved 11 December 2011.
  6. "Precipitation average" (in Hebrew). Israel Meteorological Service. Retrieved 12 July 2011.