Heisei period

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Satsuma-samurai-during-boshin-war-period.jpg

History of Japan

Heisei period (平成時代 Heisei jidai?), also known as the Heisei era, is a Japanese era (年号, nengō,?, lit. "year name") after Shōwa. This period started in February 1989[1] and it continues in the present day. During this time, the emperor is Akihito (明仁?),[2] also known as the "current emperor" or the "reigning emperor" (今上天皇 kinjō tennō?).[3]

The nengō Heisei means "Achieving Peace"[4] or "Peace and Accomplishment"[1]

Events of the Heisei period[change | edit source]

The years in which Akihito has been the Japanese monarch comprise this period or era.[5]

Disasters[change | edit source]

  • January 17, 1995 (Heisei 7, 17th day of the 1st month): Kobe Earthquake.[7]
  • 15 March 2011 (Heisei 23, 15th day of the 3rd month): Emperor Akihito made his first national television address. He said, "I hope from the bottom of my heart that the people will, hand in hand, treat each other with compassion and overcome these difficult times."[9]

Politics[change | edit source]

  • 1989 (Heisei 1): Emperor Shōwa died; and Noboru Takeshita was the Prime Minister during the time of transition.
  • 1990 (Heisei 2): Kaifu became 77th Prime Minister[12]
  • 1996 (Heisei 8): Hashimoto became 83rd Prime Minister[12]
  • 2000 (Heisei 12): Mori became 86th Prime Minister[12]
  • 2003 (Heisei 15): Koizumi became 88th Prime Minister[12]
  • 2005 (Heisei 17): Koizumi became 89th Prime Minister[12]

Gallery[change | edit source]

Related pages[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2002). "Heisei" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 306.
  2. Nussbaum, "Akihito" at p. 19.
  3. Nussbaum, "Kinjō" at p. 522.
  4. Dean, Meryll. (2002). Japanese Legal System, p. 55.
  5. GlobalSecurity.org, Japanese years; retrieved 2012-12-15.
  6. Sanger, David E. "Japan's Emperor Tells China Only of His 'Sadness' on War," New York Times. October 24, 1992; retrieved 2011-12-15.
  7. Trends in Japan, "Earthquake Readiness: From Underground Stores to Satellite Monitoring," April 2, 1998]; U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), "Historic Earthquakes, Kobe, Japan"; retrieved 2011-12-15.
  8. USGS, "Magnitude 9.0 Near the east coast of Honshu, Japan"; retrieved 2011-12-25.
  9. Behr, Peter. "Radiation Levels Spike, Forcing Temporary Retreat by Reactor Emergency Workers at Fukushima," New York Times. March 16, 2011; retrieved 2011-12-15.
  10. Nussbaum, "Unō Sōsuke" at p. 1015.
  11. Nussbaum, "Kaifū Toshiki" at p. 450.
  12. 12.00 12.01 12.02 12.03 12.04 12.05 12.06 12.07 12.08 12.09 12.10 12.11 12.12 Kantei, 61st-90th (1964-2007); retrieved 2011-12-15.
  13. Nussbaum, "Miyazawa Kiichi" at pp. 651-652.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Kantei, 91st-  (2007-present); retrieved 2011-12-15.
  15. Kantei, Previous cabinets (since 1996); retrieved 2011-12-15.
  16. Kantei, Current Prime Minister; retrieved 2011-12-15.
  17. Kantei, "Press Conference by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe"; retrieved 2013-1-23.

Other websites[change | edit source]

Media related to Heisei era at Wikimedia Commons


Heisei 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th
1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Heisei 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
2009 2010 2011 2012
Preceded by:
Shōwa
Era or nengō:
Heisei
Succeeded by:
——