Indonesia AirAsia Flight 8501

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Indonesia AirAsia Flight 8501 was a passenger flight from Surabaya to Singapore. The plane was an Airbus A320. On December 28 2014, the airplane crashed due to technical failure and bad weather in the Java Sea, Indonesia.[1] All 162 people on the plane were killed. Human bodies and debris began surfacing two days after the incident.[2] The plane was said to have lost contact with air traffic control 42 minutes after takeoff. The plane wreckage and bodies of the passengers were pulled from the Java Sea in the waters of Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo island, The Guardian reported.[3]

According to the reports, investigators traced the failure of both the rudder and computer systems to a cracked solder joint inside circuit boards. The rudder system had experienced problems 23 times since January 2014, reported the aircraft maintenance team.[4][5]

Passengers and crew[change | change source]

Flight 8501 had 155 passengers and seven crew members on board. The passenger list consisted of 137 adults, 17 children and one infant. The crew consisted of two pilots, 4 flight attendants and a company engineer. The crash victims included people from Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, France, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

The Captain was 53-year-old Iriyanto, an Indonesian pilot who had 20,537 flying hours.

The First Officer was 46-year old Rémi Emmanuel Plesel, a French pilot who had 2,247 flying hours.[6]

References[change | change source]

  1. "AirAsia captain's behaviour 'very unusual' prior to QZ8501 crash, investigators learn". The Independent. 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  2. "Two more bodies found". CBS News. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  3. Lamb, Kate (2015-12-01). "AirAsia crash: crew lost control of plane after apparent misunderstanding". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  4. "Flight QZ8501: What we know". BBC News. 2015-12-01. Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  5. CNN, Tiffany Ap, for. "Pilot response led to AirAsia crash into Java Sea - CNN". CNN. Retrieved 2017-10-19.
  6. Fuller, Thomas; Bradsher, Keith (2014-12-31). "Crash of AirAsia Flight 8501 Spotlights Indonesia's Poor Air Safety Record". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-10-19.