Introversion and extroversion

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Introversion and extroversion is a personality dimension. It was promoted by Carl Jung in the 1920s. Individual people differ on this scale. Introverts are quiet and shy, and extroverts are loud and sociable. According to the theory, introverts get energy from inside themselves (ideas and concepts in their own minds), and extroverts get energy from outside of themselves (interacting with other people). There are many concepts or understanding about introversion and extroversion that are false or myths. Such as the idea that introverts are not talkative and live their lives emotionless.

The idea of introversion and extroversion has been used in many personality tests and is an important factor.

Those who follow this way of looking at the world say that everyone has some parts of both traits in them, though one will usually dominate over the other. At one time, extroverts were thought to make up almost three-fourths of American society. Now, researchers typically assume that the number of extroverts is pretty much equal to the number of introverts in the country.