Irreducible Mind

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Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century is a 2007 parapsychology book.[1] The book talks about ideas proposed by Frederic William Henry Myers. Irreducible Mind says that the mind is separate from the brain or body. The book says that the mind continues on after death.[2]

The authors come from various fields of psychology, science studies, and psychical research.[2] Lead author Edward F. Kelly is Professor of Research in the Division of Perceptual Studies at the University of Virginia.[3]

Criticism[change | change source]

The book has been criticized for endorsing paranormal claims and pseudoscience. In a review, clinical neurologist Sebastian Dieguez said the book is "painstakingly redundant, astoundingly arrogant in its claims and intents". Dieguez wrote that the authors of Irreducible Mind took reports of paranormal phenomena and wild claims at face value, talked "quantum babble" and formed an ignorant "soul of the gaps" argument.[4]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Edward F. Kelly, Emily Williams Kelly, Adam Crabtree, Alan Gauld, Michael Grosso, and Bruce Greyson. Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007, xxxi + 800 pp. ISBN 978-0-7425-4792-6
  2. 2.0 2.1 Dominic W. Massaro. Book Review: Irreducible Mind American Journal of Psychology, Volume 123, Number 2, Summer 2010.
  3. Edward Francis Kelly, Ph.D. Division of Perceptual Studies, University of Virginia.
  4. Dieguez, Sebastian. 2008. The Soul of the Gaps. (Review of Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century by Edward F. Kelly, Emily Williams Kelly, Adam Crabtree, Alan Gauld, Michael Grosso, and Bruce Greyson). Skeptic 15: 75-77.