Jammu and Kashmir (union territory)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Jammu and Kashmir
Pahalgam Valley.jpg
Akhnoor Fort - Jammu - Jammu and Kashmir - DSC 0001.jpg
Jammu and Kashmir
A map of Jammu and Kashmir
Administering CountryIndia
Union territory31 October 2019
CapitalShimla (May–October)
Jammu (Nov–April)[1]
Districts20
Government
 • BodyGovernment of Jammu and Kashmir
 • Lieutenant GovernorGirish Chandra Murmu
 • Chief MinisterVacant
 • LegislatureUnicameral (114 seats)[2]
 • Parliamentary constituencyRajya Sabha (4)
Lok Sabha (5)
 • High CourtJammu and Kashmir High Court
Area
 • Total42,241 km2 (16,309 sq mi)
Highest elevation7,135 m (23,409 ft)
Lowest elevation247 m (810 ft)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total12,258,433
 • Density290/km2 (750/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+05:30 (IST)
ISO 3166 codeIN-JK
Vehicle registrationJK
LanguagesKashmiri, Dogri, Punjabi, Pahari, Gojri,[4] Bhadarwahi,[5] Bateri,[6] Shina,[7] and Burushaski[8]
Hindi, Urdu[9][10], English (administrative)
Websitehttps://www.jk.gov.in

Jammu and Kashmir is the northern union territory of India. The union territory of Jammu and Kashmir is separated by the Line of Control from the Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan in the west and north respectively. It shares border with Himachal Pradesh and Punjab and to the west of Ladakh.

Under Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Act, 2019, which was passed by both houses of the Parliament of India in August 2019, Jammu and Kashmir (state) was divided in two union territories namely Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh.

References[change | change source]

  1. Desk, The Hindu Net (8 May 2017). "What is the Darbar Move in J&K all about?". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 10 November 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  2. "Jammu and Kashmir transitions from a state into 2 federal units". 31 October 2019.
  3. "Saser Kangri – AAC Publications – Search The American Alpine Journal and Accidents". Publications.americanalpineclub.org. Archived from the original on 14 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  4. Khan, N. (6 August 2012). The Parchment of Kashmir: History, Society, and Polity. Springer. p. 184. ISBN 9781137029584. Archived from the original on 23 February 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  5. "Bhadrawahi". Ethnologue.com. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  6. Bateri.
  7. Crane, Robert I. (1956). Area Handbook on Jammu and Kashmir State. University of Chicago for the Human Relations Area Files. p. 179. Shina is the most eastern of these languages and in some of its dialects such as the Brokpa of Dah and Hanu and the dialect of Dras, it impinges upon the area of the Sino-Tibetan language family and has been affected by Tibetan with an overlay of words and idioms.
  8. "Pakistan's "Burushaski" Language Finds New Relatives". Npr.org. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  9. Department of Tourism, Jammu and Kashmir
  10. https://sg.inflibnet.ac.in/jspui/bitstream/10603/90065/8/08_chapter2.pdf