Jay Inslee

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Jay Inslee
Jay Inslee by Gage Skidmore.jpg
23rd Governor of Washington
Assumed office
January 16, 2013
LieutenantBrad Owen
Cyrus Habib
Preceded byChristine Gregoire
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Washington's 1st district
In office
January 3, 1999 – March 20, 2012
Preceded byRick White
Succeeded bySuzan DelBene
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Washington's 4th district
In office
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995
Preceded bySid Morrison
Succeeded byDoc Hastings
Member of the Washington House of Representatives
from the 14th district
In office
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1993
Preceded byJim Lewis
Succeeded byDave Lemmon
Personal details
Born
Jay Robert Inslee

(1951-02-09) February 9, 1951 (age 68)
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic Party
Alma materUniversity of Washington, Seattle
Willamette University

Jay Robert Inslee (born February 9, 1951) is an American politician. In 2013, he became the 23rd Governor of the US state of Washington. Before becoming the governor, he was a United States Congressman in the House of Representatives for more than 20 years. He is a member of the Democratic Party.[1]

Inslee is known for climate change policies and for his education reforms in Washington state. He was Chair of the Democratic Governors Association from 2018 to 2019.

On March 1, 2019, Inslee announced his campaign for President of the United States.[2]

Early life[change | change source]

Inslee was born in Seattle, Washington. He graduated from the University of Washington and Willamette University College of Law. A politically active student, he became a criminal prosecutor after graduation.

Early political career[change | change source]

He was in the Washington House of Representatives from 1989 to 1993. In 1992, Inslee was elected to represent Washington's 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. He was defeated for reelection in 1994. Inslee briefly returned to private legal practice. He made his first run for Governor of Washington in 1996, but lost.

He was regional director for the United States Department of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton.

Congress[change | change source]

Inslee returned to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1999, this time for Washington's 1st congressional district. He was reelected six times before announcing that he would make another run for governor in the 2012 election. He resigned from Congress to focus on his campaign.

Governor of Washington[change | change source]

He defeated Republican Rob McKenna, the Attorney General of Washington. Inslee was reelected to a second term in 2016, defeating Republican Seattle Port Commissioner Bill Bryant, 54% to 46%.

He became known nationwide for his climate change reforms and for his criticisms of President Donald Trump. Inslee, State Attorney General Bob Ferguson and State Solicitor General Noah Purcell sued the Trump Administration over Executive Order 13769. The case led to the order being blocked by the courts and it was later superseded by other executive orders.

2020 presidential run[change | change source]

In December 2018, Inslee created a PAC to raise money for a possible presidential bid in the 2020 election.[3] On January 2, 2019, it was reported that Inslee was beginning to form an exploratory committee, the first step in a campaign.[4]

On February 27, 2019, it was reported that Inslee would soon launch a campaign.[5] He formally did so on March 1, 2019 in Seattle.[6]

Personal life[change | change source]

Inslee lives on Bainbridge Island, Washington. He and his wife Trudi have 3 children.[7] He married Trudi in 1972.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Jay Inslee". Project VoteSmart. Votesmart. Retrieved 2013-03-19.
  2. Halper, Evan (March 1, 2019). "Jay Inslee, governor of Washington, launches a climate-first presidential campaign". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  3. Brunner, Jim (December 6, 2018). "Gov. Jay Inslee's new PAC raises $112,000 as he 'actively' considers presidential run". Seattle Times. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  4. Kroll, Andy (January 2, 2019). "Jay Inslee, the 'Climate Candidate,' Joins the 2020 Race". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  5. "Jay Inslee 2020 presidential run: Sources confirm he'll announce on Friday". KIRO. February 27, 2019.
  6. Land, Ted (March 1, 2019). "Seattle solar company that hosted Inslee explains industry challenges". KING 5 News. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  7. "Jay Robert Inslee". Election 2012. The Washington Times. Retrieved 2013-03-19.

Other websites[change | change source]