Jeffrey Epstein

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Jeffrey Epstein
Epstein 2013 mugshot.jpg
Jeffrey Epstein's 2013 mugshot
Born
Jeffrey Edward Epstein

(1953-01-20)January 20, 1953
DiedAugust 10, 2019(2019-08-10) (aged 66)
New York City, U.S.
Cause of deathSuicide by hanging
NationalityAmerican
EducationCooper Union
(no degree)
New York University
(no degree)
Criminal chargeSex offender, Sex trafficking
Criminal penalty13 months (2008)

Jeffrey Edward Epstein (January 20, 1953 – August 10, 2019[1]) was an American financier and a registered sex offender.[2][3] He started his career in an investment bank called Bear Stearns. A few years later, made his own investment bank, J. Epstein & Co.[4] He was born in New York City.

In 2008, he was arrested for paying an underage girl for prostitution. He spent 13 months in "custody with work release", which means that he was allowed to be outside of prison for up to 16 hours per day.[5] Epstein was arrested again on July 6, 2019.[6] He was arrested because he did sex trafficking of minors in the states of Florida and New York.[7] Epstein has been a registered sex offender since 2008.[3]

On August 10, 2019, he killed himself by hanging.[8][9] The medical examiner told court that Epstein committed suicide,[10] but Epstein's lawyers disagreed.[11][12] On August 29, 2019, the judge decided to end the criminal investigation of Epstein.[13][14]

Career[change | change source]

Epstein was teaching calculus and physics at the Dalton School in Manhattan between 1973 to 1975.[4] In 1976, Epstein started work as an options trader (a job where stock brokers can buy or sell shares at an agreed price at a later date) at Bear Stearns,[4] where he advised very rich people on financial strategies relating to taxes.[4] As he was shown to be a successful worker during his financial career, Epstein became promoted to a limited partner (a job that manages money within a company) at Bear Stearns in 1980.[4][15]

Jeffrey Edward Epstein had founded his investment bank, J. Epstein & Co. in 1982.[4] His investment bank had managed the assets of every person who had invested at his investments bank.[4] Currently, his investment bank is worth more than US$1 billion.[4]

Criminal history[change | change source]

First signs of criminal activity (2005–06)[change | change source]

In March 2005, a woman called Florida's Palm Beach Police Department because she was concerned about what happened to her 14-year-old stepdaughter. She said to them that her 14-year-old stepdaughter had been taken to Epstein's mansion by an older girl.[16] In the mansion, the woman claimed that her stepdaughter been paid $300 to strip and massage Epstein.[4][17] The stepdaughter was claimed to be undressed. When she left Epstein's mansion, she wearing still wearing her underwear.[18] Police spent 11 months investigating Epstein and his home. The Federal Bureau of Investigation were also investigating Epstein and his home. It was discovered that Epstein was confirmed to have paid girls under 18 years old to perform sexual acts on him.[19] Both the police and the FBI interviewed five claimed victims and 17 witnesses about this incident. Based on what they were discussing in the interviews, it was discovered that there are photos of abused underaged girls found in Epstein's trash.[20] In fact, some of the trashed photos were confirmed to match the interviewed victims.[18][21]

In 2006, it was discovered that Epstein would often secretly install cameras everywhere around his property.[22] Often he installs secret cameras everywhere around his property so that he can record sexual activity with underage girls by famous people.[22][23] It was also discovered that Epstein used blackmail to threaten those famous people deceptively through his secret recordings.[23] These criminal claims were obtained from information relating to a previous lawsuit made by those famous people in 2006.[23] Epstein was claimed to have used underaged girls to spy on those famous people, which allowed him to blackmail those famous people.[19] In 2015, it was revealed that Prince Andrew, Duke of York was one of the victims who were abused by Epstein's blackmailing.[19] One of the former employees who worked for Jeffrey Epstein had stated that Epstein would receive three massages per day by the underaged girls.[18] Eventually the FBI received proof that indeed Epstein was blackmailing famous people by spying on famous people.[19]

In May 2006, the Palm Beach police had concluded that Jeffrey Epstein will be charged with four counts of unlawful sex with minors and one count of molestation (forcing sexual abuse).[24][25] However, the court disagrees. Epstein had a team of defense lawyers. His team of defense lawyers included Roy Black, Russell Crowe,[26] Gerald Lefcourt, Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz. In 2007, Ken Starr, the Special Prosecutor of Bill Clinton, joined in to protect Epstein.[27][28] The police chief of Palm Beach, Michael Reiter, blamed the court for being too flexible when it comes to Epstein's criminal case. Additionally, the police chief was not satisfied that court did not pass on the information clearly enough to the FBI.[27]

In the end, the grand jury said only that Epstein had a single charge of unfair payment of prostitution.[29] In 2006, they concluded that Epstein had pleaded not guilty.[30]

Non-prosecution agreement (NPA) (2006–2008)[change | change source]

On February 6, 2008, an anonymous woman from Virginia filed a lawsuit worth $50 million against Epstein.[31] She claims that when she was 16 years old between 2004-2005, she was sexually assaulted by Epstein. Initially, she was "recruited to give Epstein a massage", but later on Epstein went naked and had sexual intercourse with her.[29] He paid her $200 immediately afterwards.[29] On March 2008, a similar $50 million lawsuit was filed against Epstein by another woman who was sexually abused.[32] However, these lawsuits alongside similar lawsuits were dismissed (all of these lawsuits were cancelled and ignored).[33] Epstein deals with these types of lawsuits outside of court by paying the victims with compensation money.[34][33]

On 2008, he had a secret non-prosecution agreement with court that allowed him to have a lower court penalty while at the same time still keeping his luxury private locations.[35][36] Instead of having a life sentence, he was only jailed for 18 months (but served 13 months in jail) and only had to settle the victims with payments of money.[36][37] However, he still had to register as a sex offender.[36]

Arrest and registration as a sex offender (2008–2011)[change | change source]

On 2008, he had a secret agreement with court that he would receive a lower court penalty. Along with a shorter jail sentence, he was allowed "custody with work release", which means that he was allowed to be outside of prison for up to 16 hours per day.[5] Epstein spent 13 months inside jail. After he was released from jail, he received one year of house arrest (punishment by "jailing" into their own house while supervised with a supervisor officer) with probation (regular official supervision required by law) until August 2010. While he was on probation, he was allowed to travel in his plane to his private homes in the city Manhattan and in the U.S. Virgin Islands. He was allowed long shopping trips and to walk around Palm Beach "for exercise".[38]

After a difficult court hearing (a type of law negotiation where a change in court penalty is to be discussed and agreed upon) was made in January 2011, he had stayed registered in New York State as a "level three" (high risk of repeat offense) sex offender for the rest of his life.[39][40] At that court hearing, the Manhattan District Attorney tried to argue that Epstein should be reduced to a low-risk "level one", but he was refused by the judge. Epstein told the judge that his "main" home was in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The judge told him that he had to check in with the New York Police Department every 90 days. Even though Epstein had been a level-three registered sex offender in New York since 2010, the New York Police Department never enforced the 90-day regulation, despite the fact that not following these rules is considered against the law.[41]

Trafficking of young girls (2019)[change | change source]

US v. Jeffrey Epstein document[2]

On July 6, 2019, Epstein was arrested at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey because he was doing sex trafficking. According to witnesses and sources, it is believed that the FBI broke into Epstein's Manhattan townhouse, the Herbert N. Straus House, to investigate Epstein's criminal behavior further.[42][43] Two days later, the Public Corruption Unit of the Southern District of New York charged Epstein for attempted sex trafficking of minors. Court documents show that Epstein was attempting to bring at least 40 underaged girls to his mansion to sexually abuse them.[7] Judge Kenneth Marra is currently deciding whether Epstein should continue being protected from harsher court punishments.[44]

It was discovered that Epstein owned a private Boeing 727 jet that he had used to invite underaged guests to his mansion. He would travel in his private jet frequently, logging "600 flying hours a year (...) usually with guests on board."[45][46][47]

Personal life[change | change source]

Jeffrey Epstein had long history with meeting with famous people because he was a successful businessman.[48] He was friends with Prince Andrew and Tom Barrack,[49] and had joined parties with many famous people, including Bill Clinton, George Stephanopoulos, Donald Trump,[50] Katie Couric, and Woody Allen.[51]

Epstein also is interested in funding science research and education. In 2000, he established the Jeffrey Epstein VI Foundation, which funds science research and education. Before 2003, the foundation funded Martin Nowak's research at the Institute for Advanced Study in the city of Princeton, New Jersey. In May 2003, Epstein had created the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University, a program aimed to research evolution, with a $30 million gift.[52]

Death[change | change source]

On July 23, 2019, he was found unconscious in his jail cell with injuries to his neck.[53][54] His cellmate, former police officer Nicholas Tartaglione, was asked by police if he had tried to murder Epstein at 1:30 am, since he had history of murdering people. He told them that he didn't do anything violent to Epstein. When police asked Epstein about that incident, Epstein refused to reply to them.[55][56][57][58] After that incident, he was placed on suicide watch.[16]

Six days later on July 29, Epstein was taken off suicide watch. He had been moved into a special housing unit with another inmate (person living in jail).[53] Epstein's close friends believed that Epstein was still happy while in jail.[59] The jail told the Justice Department to regularly check Epstein's jail cell. They made sure that Epstein always had a cellmate nearby. Additionally, a guard would check his cell every 30 minutes for any suspicious activity. The Justice Department followed these rules everyday until they accidentally didn't on the night before his death.[53][60][61] On August 9, Epstein's former cellmate was transferred out of Epstein's cell, but no replacement cellmate was brought in.[62] Later in the evening, Epstein had not been checked every 30 minutes.[60][53][61] The two guards that were supposed to supervise Epstein fell asleep for three hours and made false records of Epstein's activity.[53][63] Two cameras in front of Epstein's cell also stopped working that night.[12]

Epstein killed himself by hanging on August 10, 2019,[8] while at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City. His body was found in his cell at 6:30 a.m.[64][9] U.S Attorney General William Barr ordered an investigation by the Department of Justice Inspector General in addition to the FBI investigation.[65] Epstein was 66 years old.

On August 29, 2019, the judge decided to end the criminal investigation of Epstein. This is because it is no longer possible to investigate Epstein's criminal activity further due to his confirmed death.[13][14]

References[change | change source]

  1. Rashbaum, William K.; Weiser, Benjamin; Gold, Michael (2019-08-10). "Jeffrey Epstein Dead in Suicide at Manhattan Jail, Officials Say". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-08-10.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Jeffrey Epstein Charged in Manhattan Federal Court With Sex Trafficking of Minors". www.justice.gov. 2019-07-08. Archived from the original on July 8, 2019. Retrieved 2019-07-08. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 Lewis, Paul (January 4, 2015). "Jeffrey Epstein: The rise and fall of teacher turned tycoon". Guardian. Archived from the original on November 26, 2016. Retrieved November 7, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 Thomas, Landon Jr. (October 28, 2002). "Jeffrey Epstein: International Money Man of Mystery". New York. Archived from the original on November 10, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20161110041617/http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/people/n_7912/. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Buncombe, Andrew (January 2, 2015). "Jeffrey Epstein: the billionaire paedophile with links to Bill Clinton, Kevin Spacey, Robert Maxwell – and Prince Andrew". The Independent. London, England: Independent Print Ltd. Archived from the original on September 25, 2015. Retrieved November 7, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  6. Jeffrey Epstein, a Billionaire Friend of Presidents Trump & Clinton, Arrested for Sex Trafficking | Democracy Now!
  7. 7.0 7.1 Shallwani, Pervaiz; Briquelet, Kate; Siegel, Harry (2019-07-06). "Jeffrey Epstein Arrested for Sex Trafficking of Minors". Daily Beast. Archived from the original on July 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019-07-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. 8.0 8.1 Winter, Tom; Dienst, Jonathan; McCausland, Phil. "Jeffrey Epstein, accused sex trafficker, is dead by apparent suicide, found in his Manhattan jail cell". NBC News. Retrieved 2019-08-10.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Zapotosky, Matt; Barrett, Devlin; Merle, Renae; Leonnig, Carol D. (August 10, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein dead after apparent suicide in New York jail". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  10. Sisak, Michael R.; Balsamo, Michael; Neumeister, Larry (August 17, 2019). "Medical examiner rules Epstein death a suicide by hanging". AP NEWS.
  11. Stockler, Asher (August 27, 2019). "Epstein Lawyers say evidence 'far more consistent' with murder than suicide". Newsweek. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Hosenball, Mark (August 28, 2019). "FBI studies two broken cameras outside cell where Epstein died: source". Reuters. London. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Neumeister, Larry (August 29, 2019). "Judge ends case against Epstein, with a nod to the accusers". Associated Press.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Pierson, Brendan (August 30, 2019). "Case against Jeffrey Epstein dismissed following his death". Reuters.
  15. Ward, Vicky (June 27, 2011). "The Talented Mr. Epstein". Vanity Fair. New York City: Condé Nast. Archived from the original on June 12, 2015. Retrieved June 11, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  16. 16.0 16.1 Helmore, Edward (2019-08-10). "Jeffrey Epstein dies after apparent suicide in New York jail". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-08-10.
  17. Callahan, Maureen (October 9, 2016). "The 'sex slave' scandal that exposed pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein". New York Post. Archived from the original on July 27, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 "Billionaire in Palm Beach sex scandal; Investigators: Moneyman Jeffrey Epstein solicited teen masseuses". The Smoking Gun. July 26, 2006. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Lewis, Paul; Swaine, Jon (January 10, 2015). "Jeffrey Epstein: Inside the decade of scandal entangling Prince Andrew". The Guardian. London, England: Guardian Media Group. Archived from the original on May 22, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  20. Marra, Andrew (August 14, 2006). "Jeffrey Epstein craved big homes, elite friends – and, investigators say, underage girls". The Palm Beach Post. Palm Beach, Florida: GateHouse Media. Archived from the original on June 16, 2011.
  21. "Palm Beach Police Dep't Probable Cause Affadavit". The Smoking Gun. May 1, 2006. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Bhagat, Pooja (January 7, 2015). "Prince Andrew Might Have Been Caught on Tape With 'Sex Slave'". International Business Times. New York City. Archived from the original on January 29, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2016. According to reports, papers filed against his friend Jeffrey Epstein in 2006 mentioned that he had installed hidden cameras everywhere in his property to record the indecent acts of important people with underage prostitutes for further criminal use such as blackmail. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  23. 23.0 23.1 23.2 Bhagat, Pooja (January 7, 2015). "Prince Andrew Might Have Been Caught on Tape With 'Sex Slave'". International Business Times. New York City: IBT Media. Archived from the original on January 29, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2016. According to recent reports, paper filed against his friend Jeffrey Epstein in 2006 mentioned that he had installed hidden cameras everywhere in his property to record the indecent acts of important people with underage prostitutes for further criminal use such as blackmail. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  24. "Billionaire in Palm Beach sex scandal; Investigators: Moneyman Jeffrey Epstein solicited teen masseuses". The Smoking Gun. July 26, 2006. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  25. "Palm Beach Police Dep't Probable Cause Affadavit". The Smoking Gun. May 1, 2006. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015.
  26. U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York v. Jeffrey Stein, et al, Wall Street Journal, June 27, 2006. Retrieved July 12, 2019.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Weiss, Philip (December 10, 2007). "The Fantasist". New York. https://nymag.com/news/features/41826/. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  28. "Lewinsky prosecutor joins defense of Clinton crony". Palm Beach Post. September 12, 2007. Archived from the original on May 16, 2012. Retrieved July 10, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 Keller, Larry (February 6, 2008). "Second teen-sex suit seeks $50 million from Jeffrey Epstein". The Palm Beach Post. GateHouse Media. Archived from the original on February 9, 2008.
  30. Goodnough, Abby (September 3, 2006). "Questions of Preferential Treatment Are Raised in Florida Sex Case". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 6, 2011. Retrieved July 10, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  31. "'Jane Doe' v. Jeffrey Epstein: Billionaire faces $50M sexual assault lawsuit". FindLaw. Thomson Reuters. February 6, 2008. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  32. Keller, Larry (March 5, 2008). "Third alleged victim files sex suit against Jeffrey Epstein". The Palm Beach Post. GateHouse Media. Archived from the original on March 8, 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  33. 33.0 33.1 Lewis, Paul; Ball, James (January 3, 2015). "Prince Andrew named in U.S. lawsuit over underage sex claims". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 19, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  34. Rush, George; Molloy, Joanna (January 10, 2010). "Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein shells out more money in latest sex abuse lawsuit". Daily News. New York. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  35. https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/07/billionaire-jeffrey-epstein-arrested-on-sex-trafficking-charges.html
  36. 36.0 36.1 36.2 https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/jeffrey-epstein-s-once-secret-sex-offender-plea-deal-must-n1021471
  37. When Jeffrey Epstein Joked About Sex Abuse - The Atlantic
  38. Brown, Julie K. (November 28, 2018). "Even from jail, sex abuser manipulated the system. His victims were kept in the dark". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved December 1, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  39. Dargan, Michele (November 22, 2011). "Jeffrey Epstein must register as NY's highest level sex offender". Palm Beach Daily News. GateHouse Media. Archived from the original on September 17, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  40. Sutherland, Amber (February 25, 2011). "Billionaire Jeffrey Epstein: I'm a sex offender, not a predator". New York Post. Tronc. Archived from the original on January 13, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  41. Sales, Ben (July 11, 2019). "Alan Dershowitz helped Jeffrey Epstein secure his controversial plea deal. He has no regrets".
  42. Brown, Julie K. (2019-07-06). "Jeffrey Epstein arrested on sex trafficking charges". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on July 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019-07-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  43. "Here's the $77M Mansion the Feds Want to Seize from Jeffrey Epstein". Heavy. July 8, 2019. Archived from the original on July 8, 2019. Retrieved July 8, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  44. "Jeffrey Epstein 'arrested on sex charges'". 2019-07-07. Archived from the original on July 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019-07-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  45. Ostler, Catherine. "Jeffrey Epstein: The Sex Offender Who Mixes With Princes and Premiers". Newsweek. Archived from the original on September 4, 2018. Retrieved September 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  46. Bryant, Nick (2015-01-22). "Flight Logs Put Clinton, Dershowitz on Pedophile Billionaire's Sex Jet". Gawker. Archived from the original on September 12, 2018. Retrieved September 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  47. Calahan, Maureen (October 9, 2016). "The 'sex slave' scandal that exposed pedophile billionaire Jeffrey Epstein". New York Post. Archived from the original on July 27, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  48. "Who Was Jeffrey Epstein Calling? A close study of his circle—social, professional, transactional—reveals a damning portrait of elite New York". New York. July 22, 2019. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  49. Wolff, Michael (2018). Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House. New York City: Henry Holt and Company. p. 53. ISBN 978-1-250-15806-2. Archived from the original on April 8, 2018. Retrieved April 8, 2018 – via Google Books. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  50. Fisher, Marc. "Trump's Labor nominee Acosta cut deal with billionaire in underage sex abuse case". Archived from the original on July 31, 2018. Retrieved August 12, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  51. Harris, Paul (March 12, 2011). "Prince Andrew's link to sex offender Jeffrey Epstein taints royalty in US". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 8, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  52. Scharnick, Jacquelyn M. (June 5, 2003). "People in the News: Jeffrey E. Epstein". The Harvard Crimson. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved November 7, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  53. 53.0 53.1 53.2 53.3 53.4 Watkins, Ali; Ivory, Danielle; Goldbaum, Christina (August 17, 2019). "Inmate 76318-054: The Last Days of Jeffrey Epstein". The New York Times. Retrieved August 18, 2019.
  54. "Jeffrey Epstein taken off suicide watch after examination by 'doctoral-level psychologist,' DOJ says". Fox News. Retrieved 2019-08-23.
  55. Drury, Colin (July 25, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein: Billionaire paedophile 'found with neck injuries in jail'". The Independent. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  56. Dienst, Jonathan (July 24, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein Found Injured in NYC Jail Cell After Possible Suicide Attempt: Sources". WNBC. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  57. Robertson, James; Heger, Jen (July 25, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein Suspected Of Attempting Suicide In Jail". RadarOnline. Archived from the original on July 25, 2019. Retrieved July 25, 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  58. Rashbaum, William K.; Weiser, Benjamin; Gold, Michael (July 25, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein Is Found Injured in Jail Cell". The New York Times. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  59. "Jeffrey Epstein dead after 'apparent suicide' in New York". Washington Post. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  60. 60.0 60.1 Watkins, Ali (2019-08-10). "Why Wasn't Jeffrey Epstein on Suicide Watch When He Died?". The New York Times. Retrieved 2019-08-10.
  61. 61.0 61.1 Benner, Katie; Ivory, Danielle; Jr, Richard A. Oppel (August 11, 2019). "Before Jail Suicide, Epstein Was Left Alone and Not Closely Monitored". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-08-11.
  62. Zapotsky, Matt; Barrett, Devlin (August 11, 2019). "Correction officers, did not check on Epstein for several hours before his death, violating protocol, person familiar with the case says". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  63. Benner, Katie; Ivory, Danielle (2019-08-13). "Jeffrey Epstein Death: 2 Guards Slept Through Checks and Falsified Records". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-08-14.
  64. Rashbaum, William K.; Weiser, Benjamin; Gold, Michael (August 10, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein Dead in Suicide at Manhattan Jail, Officials Say". The New York Times. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  65. Suarez Sang, Lucia I. (August 10, 2019). "Jeffrey Epstein dead from apparent suicide in Manhattan jail cell; FBI investigating". Fox News. Retrieved 10 August 2019.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Jeffrey Epstein at Wikimedia Commons