Joshua Nkomo

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Joshua Nkomo
Joshua Nkomo (1978).jpg
Nkomo in 1978
Vice-President of Zimbabwe
In office
1987–1999
PresidentRobert Mugabe
Vice PresidentSimon Muzenda
Succeeded byJoseph Msika
Minister of Home Affairs
In office
1980–1982
PresidentCanaan Banana
Prime MinisterRobert Mugabe
Personal details
Born(1917-06-19)19 June 1917
Southern Rhodesia
Died1 July 1999(1999-07-01) (aged 82)
Harare, Zimbabwe
NationalityZimbabwean
Political partyZAPU
ZANU-PF
Alma materTjolotjo Government Industrial School, Adams College, Jan Hofmeyer School of Social Workers
ProfessionPolitician, guerrilla leader, trade unionist, businessman

Joshua Mqabuko Nyongolo Nkomo (19 June 1917[1] – 1 July 1999) was the leader and founder of the Zimbabwe African People's Union (ZAPU) and a member of the Ndebele (Kalanga) tribe.[2]

Nkomo was jailed for ten years by Rhodesia's white minority government. After his release, ZAPU contributed to the fall of that government. Then they fought with a rival group led by Robert Mugabe. Mugabe became President of Zimbabwe. Nkomo was not trusted and eventually fled the country.

Honors[change | change source]

In 1999 Nkomo was declared a National Hero. He is buried in the National Heroes Acre in Harare.[3]

On 27 June 2000, a set of four postage stamps were issued with Nkomo's image.

References[change | change source]

  1. Jessup, John E. An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945–1996. P. 533.
  2. Hill, Geoff. The Battle for Zimbabwe: The Final Countdown, 2003. Page 52.
  3. McNeil, Jr., Donald G. (2 July 1999). "Joshua Nkomo of Zimbabwe Is Dead at 62". New York Times. Retrieved 2 October 2016.

Further reading[change | change source]

  • Joshua Nkomo with Nicholas Harman, Nkomo: The Story of My Life (autobiography), 1984; ISBN 0-413-54500-8,ISBN 978-0-413-54500-8.
  • The Zimbabwe African People's Union 1961–1987: A Political History of Insurgency in Southern Rhodesia.
  • Terence O. Ranger, ‘"Nkomo, Joshua Mqabuko Nyongolo (1917–1999)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. accessed 18 June 2006

Other websites[change | change source]