Kamakura period

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The Kamakura period (鎌倉時代, Kamakura jidai) is a time in the Japanese history from 1185 through 1333 in the history of Japan.[1] This grouping of years is named after city of Kamakura which was the center of power of the Kamakura shogunate.[2]

The government of shoguns which was functionally established in 1192 by Minamoto no Yoritomo.[3]

The Kamakura period ended in 1333 with the destruction of the shogunate. Imperial rule was re-established under Emperor Go-Daigo.[4]

Flourishing of Buddhism[change | change source]

Buddhism expanded during this period. A number of monks founded separate Buddhist sects, including

Hōnen, founder of the Jōdo shū sect[5]
Shinran, disciple of Hōnen; founder of Jōdo Shinshū[6]
Ippen, founder of the Ji sect[7]
Dōgen, founder of the Sōtō school of Zen[8]
Eisai, founder of the Rinzai school of Zen[9]
Nichiren, founder of the sect of Buddhism named after him[10]

The older Buddhist sects such as Shingon and Tendai continued to thrive.

Timeline[change | change source]

Gallery[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Library of Congress Country Studies, Japan,"Kamakura and Muromachi periods"; retrieved 2011-10-20.
  2. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 459. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  3. Hall, John Whitney. (1991). Japan: From Prehistory to Modern Times, pp. 86-87.
  4. Hall, p. 359.
  5. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 348. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  6. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. pp. 867–868. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  7. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 392. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  8. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 155. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  9. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 172. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  10. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 706. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  11. Kitagawa, Hiroshi and Bruce Tsuchida. (1975). The Tale of the Heike, pp. 676-690.
  12. What is Zen? History; retrieved 2012-4-29.
  13. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 635. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  14. Jodo Shu, "About Honen Shonin"; retrieved 2012-4-29.
  15. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 431. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  16. Tsubata, Kate. "The Great Buddha at Kamakura," The Washington Times, May 25, 2008; retrieved 2012-4-30.
  17. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 90. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  18. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 535. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  19. NOAA Earthquake Database Query
  20. McCullough, Helen Craig. (1959). The Taiheiki: A Chronicle of Medieval Japan, pp. 285-311.

Other websites[change | change source]