Kansas's congressional districts

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Kansas's Congressional districts since 2013[1]

Kansas has 4 congressional districts. Each has a member in the United States House of Representatives.

Current districts and representatives[change | change source]

List of members of the Kansas United States House delegation, their terms, their district borders, and the districts' political rating from the CPVI. For the 116th Congress, there are 3 Republicans and 1 Democrat.

District Representative Party CPVI Incumbency District map
1st Roger Marshall official portrait.jpg Roger Marshall (R-Great Bend) Republican R+24 January 3, 2017 – present Kansas US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Steve Watkins, official portrait, 116th congress.jpg Steve Watkins (R-Topeka) Republican R+10 January 3, 2019 – present Kansas US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Sharice Davids.jpg Sharice Davids (D-Shawnee) Democratic R+4 January 3, 2019 – present Kansas US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Ron Estes, 115th official photo.jpg Ron Estes (R-Wichita) Republican R+15 April 11, 2017 – present Kansas US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif

History[change | change source]

Historically, the state has at most eight seats (1893–1933). The number of seats decreased from five to four after the 1990 Census.

Historical and present district boundaries[change | change source]

Table of United States congressional district border maps in Kansas, presented in order of time.[2] All redistricting events in Kansas between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map
1973–1982 United States Congressional Districts in Kansas, 1973 – 1982.tif
1983–1992 United States Congressional Districts in Kansas, 1983 – 1992.tif
1993–2002 United States Congressional Districts in Kansas, 1993 – 2002.tif
2003–2013 United States Congressional Districts in Kansas, 2003 – 2013.tif
Since 2013 United States Congressional Districts in Kansas, since 2013.tif

Old districts[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  2. "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789–2012". Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  • Kansas Legislative Research Department (June 19, 2001): 1992 Congressional Districts with selected cities and county populations (pdf, 741 kb). "This map is designed to be printed on 11 x 17 inch or larger format paper."
  • Kansas Legislative Research Department (July 31, 2002): Guidelines and Criteria for 2002 Kansas Congressional and Legislative Redistricting, 2 pages (pdf).
  • National Committee for an Effective Congress (June 22, 2004)[1].