Kenosha protests

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Kenosha riot
Part of the Black Lives Matter movement,
Reactions to the shooting of Jacob Blake
DateAugust 23, 2020 (2020-08-23) – present
Location
Caused byShooting of Jacob Blake
MethodsPeaceful protesting, tear gas, pepper spray, baton rounds, rioting, vandalism, looting, arson, counter-protest vigilante action and gunfire
StatusOngoing
Casualties
Death(s)2 protesters
Injuries1 protester shot and hospitalized, 1 police officer hospitalized, 1 firefighter hospitalized [1]
Charged1 counter-protester for two counts of first degree murder
State of emergency declared effective on August 23

In the aftermath of the Jacob Blake shooting, protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, United States and elsewhere occurred as part of the larger Black Lives Matter movement[2] and reactions to other high-profile police killings of unarmed Black people in 2020.

Armed civilian counter-protesters also came. One of them shot and killed two protesters.

On August 24, Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers activated the Wisconsin National Guard to protect fire fighters and critical infrastructure in Kenosha.[3]

On August 25, one of the armed civilians[4][5] shot three people, two of whom were later pronounced dead.[6] The shooter later walked towards police vehicles with his hands up and still armed with a semi-automatic rifle, but the police vehicles drove by while.[7][8][9][10]

References[change | change source]

  1. Householder, Mike (26 August 2020). "2 people shot to death during protest over Kenosha shooting". AP. Archived from the original on August 26, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  2. "IN PHOTOS: Black Lives Matter organization rallies in Kenosha". Kenosha News. Archived from the original on August 27, 2020. Retrieved August 27, 2020.
  3. "National Guard called to Kenosha, Wis., after police shoot Black man". Los Angeles Times. August 24, 2020. Archived from the original on August 25, 2020. Retrieved August 25, 2020.
  4. "Kenosha Shooting: Video Shows Suspected Gunman Kyle Rittenhouse Being Allowed To Leave Scene". 2020-08-26. Retrieved 2020-08-27. With blue gloved hands in the air and the gun around his chest, the brigade member who was thanked at the start of the night was given safe passage past police.
  5. Willis, Haley; Xiao, Muyi; Triebert, Christiaan; Koettl, Christoph; Cooper, Stella; Botti, David; Ismay, John; Tiefenthäler, Ainara (2020-08-27). "Tracking the Suspect in the Fatal Kenosha Shootings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-08-27. About 15 minutes before the first shooting, police officers drive past Mr. Rittenhouse, and the other armed civilians who claim to be protecting the dealership, and offer water out of appreciation. Mr. Rittenhouse walks up to a police vehicle carrying his rifle and talks with the officers.
  6. Wallace, Danielle (August 26, 2020). "Kenosha violence: Suspect, 17, arrested in deadly shooting amid Jacob Blake unrest, Illinois police say". Fox News. Archived from the original on August 27, 2020. Retrieved August 27, 2020.
  7. Chris, Tye (26 August 2020). "Kenosha Shooting: Video Shows Suspected Gunman Kyle Rittenhouse Being Allowed To Leave Scene". CBS Chicago. Archived from the original on August 27, 2020. Retrieved 2020-08-27.
  8. Lourgos, Stacy St Clair, Christy Gutowski, Robert McCoppin, Angie Leventis. "What we know so far about Kyle Rittenhouse, accused vigilante in Kenosha shooting". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on August 27, 2020. Retrieved 2020-08-27.
  9. "What we know about Kyle Rittenhouse, the teenager accused of killing two people at Jacob Blake protest". www.independent.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-08-27.
  10. Willis, Haley; Xiao, Muyi; Triebert, Christiaan; Koettl, Christoph; Cooper, Stella; Botti, David; Ismay, John; Tiefenthäler, Ainara (2020-08-27). "Tracking the Suspect in the Fatal Kenosha Shootings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-08-27.