Léo Major

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Léo Major
Léo Major.jpg
Major on 1 January 1944
Born(1921-01-23)January 23, 1921
DiedOctober 12, 2008(2008-10-12) (aged 87)
NationalityCanadian
OrganizationCanadian Army
ChildrenDenis Major, Jocelyn Major, Daniel-aimé Major, Hélène Major

Léo Major DCM & Bar (January 23, 1921 – October 12, 2008) was a Canadian soldier. He was the only Canadian to ever get the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) twice in different wars.[1] Major got his first DCM in World War II in 1945 when he made the German army run away in the city of Zwolle; he did this by himself. He was sent to scout the city with one of his best friends, but he thought Zwolle was too beautiful for an attack, deciding instead to clear it out himself. A firefight happened in which his friend was killed, and after that, he put the commanders of each group of enemy soldiers he found at gunpoint. He did this until he could take soldier groups prisoner back at base. He did this again and again until the there were no more German soldiers in the city.[2] He got his second DCM in 1951 during the Korean War for leading the capture of an important hill.

Life[change | change source]

World War II[change | change source]

Major was serving with the Régiment de la Chaudière. They landed on the beaches in the Normandy Invasion on June 6, 1944.[3] During a reconnaissance mission on D-Day, Major captured a German armored vehicle (a Hanomag) by himself. The vehicle had German communication equipment and secret codes in it.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-03-11. Retrieved 2006-07-08.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. Fowler, T. Robert (Fall 2008). "Army Biography: Private Leo Major, DCM and BAR" (PDF). Canadian Army Journal: 113–118.
  3. "Leo Major | Canadian soldier". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-02-23.
  4. Major, Jocelyn (December 2008). "Leo Major: L'Honneur d'un Canadien" (PDF). Histomag '44 (57): 12–23. Retrieved 27 May 2016.

Other websites[change | change source]