LGBT rights in the United Kingdom

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LGBT map of the UK

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights in the United Kingdom have improved a lot in recent years. In 2005, civil partnerships for same sex couples was legalised across the UK. In 2014, same sex marriage was legalised in England, Scotland and Wales.[1] Gay people cannot get married in Northern Ireland because the Northern Ireland assembly voted against legalising it.[2]

Sex between two men was illegal in the UK until 1967, but no law was ever made regarding lesbian sexual activity. In 1967, sex between men was partially decriminalized in England and Wales. It was made legal for men over 21 years' old in 1967, with some very serious restrictions, legal for men over 18 in 1994, and equalized with the heterosexual age of consent in 2002. The bill in 2000 also introduced a lesbian age of consent for the first time too. In Scotland it was legalised in 1981 and in Northern Ireland it was legalized in 1982.

Legal summary[change | change source]

Same-sex sexual activity legal Yes 1967 (England and Wales)

1981 (Scotland)

1982 (Northern Ireland)

Equal age of consent Yes
Anti-discrimination laws in employment only Yes
Anti-discrimination laws in the provision of goods and services Yes
Anti-discrimination laws in all other areas (incl. indirect discrimination, hate speech) Yes
Recognition of same-sex couples (e.g. registered partnership or civil union, etc) Yes All of the UK, since 2005
Step-child adoption by same-sex couples Yes
Gays and lesbians allowed to serve openly in the military Yes
Same-sex marriages Yes (in England, Scotland and Wales, since 2014)

References[change | change source]

  1. "Gay marriage bill: Peers back government plans". BBC News Online. 4 June 2013. Retrieved 4 June 2013.
  2. Sam Mcbride (2013-06-26). "Assembly members vote to block gay marriage". Newsletter.co.uk. Retrieved 2014-04-07.